Home » Politics/Policy » Recent Articles:

Readers: No Citizenship Question Should Appear On 2020 Census

July 10, 2019 Featured, Politics/Policy Comments Off on Readers: No Citizenship Question Should Appear On 2020 Census

Despite being a hot national issue the question of a citizenship question on the 2020 Census got a low response on the recent non-scientific Sunday Poll:

Q: Agree or disagree: The 2020 Census should include a citizenship question

  • Strongly agree: 5 [23.81%]
  • Agree: 0 [0%]
  • Somewhat agree: 0 [0%]
  • Neither agree or disagree: 1 [4.76%]
  • Somewhat disagree: 0 [0%]
  • Disagree: 4 [19.05%]
  • Strongly disagree: 11 [52.38%]
  • Unsure/No Answer: 0 [0%]

An article that came out yesterday asks the right question:  What’s the big deal about adding a citizenship question to U.S. Census? (recommended reading)

What is the census used for?

The once-per-decade survey is mandated by the U.S. Constitution. Its results have major consequences for states. Census data is used to determine the number of congressional representatives for each state, and dictates how the federal government allocates more than $800 billion in funding for services such as schools and law enforcement.

Why did the Trump administration want to add the question?

A question about citizenship has not been asked of all households since the 1950 census. It has featured since then on questionnaires sent to a smaller subset of the population.

U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, whose department runs the census, announced in March 2018 that a citizenship question would be reinstated to produce better data on enforcement of the federal Voting Rights Act, which protects minorities’ electoral power. The government also said citizenship is a reasonable question to ask, noting that it is common in many other countries. The Census Bureau’s own experts estimated that households corresponding to 6.5 million people would not respond if the question were asked, leading to less accurate citizenship data.

In short, pushing to have the question added to the full decennial census is a power grab by the GOP — to gain seats in Congress.  The late GOP operative Thomas Hofeller left behind the evidence of the plot on his computer.

Files on those drives showed that he wrote a study in 2015 concluding that adding a citizenship question to the census would allow Republicans to draft even more extreme gerrymandered maps to stymie Democrats. And months after urging President Trump’s transition team to tack the question onto the census, he wrote the key portion of a draft Justice Department letter claiming the question was needed to enforce the 1965 Voting Rights Act — the rationale the administration later used to justify its decision. (New York Times)

This is clearly an attempt to intimidate people into not completing the Census, thereby undercounting millions in left-leaning states. Remember too — there are millions of non-citizens living legally in the US. A couple I know from India are here working with green cards — a family of five.

The constitution requires counting the persons living in the US — not citizens.

— Steve Patterson

 

St. Louis Board of Aldermen: New Board Bills Week 12 of 2019-2020 Session

July 3, 2019 Board of Aldermen, Featured Comments Off on St. Louis Board of Aldermen: New Board Bills Week 12 of 2019-2020 Session

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen will meet at 10am today, their  12th meeting of the 2019-2020 session. While they usually meet on Friday, they’re meeting today because of the Fourth of July holiday weekend.

As previously noted, they have the first two meetings labeled as Week #1, so they list this as week/meeting 11.

Today’s agenda includes four (4) new bills:

  • B.B.#85 – Dan Guenther – An ordinance approving the dissolution of the Cherokee Station Special Business District and the discharge of the members of its board of commissioners, by repealing Ordinance No. 58600, approved May 6, 1982.
  • B.B.#86 – Roddy – An ordinance pertaining to parking within the “4400 Gibson Avenue Residential Parking District;” establishing the location and restrictions for curb parking in the restricted parking zone within the 4400 Gibson Avenue Residential Parking District (the “District”); authorizing the placement of Permit Parking Only signs within the District; and prohibiting the parking, within the District, of any vehicle which does not display the authorized permit; containing definitions, a penalty clause and an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#87 – Narayan – An ordinance approving a blighting study and Redevelopment Plan for the 7202-7220 Arsenal St. Redevelopment Area
  • B.B.#88 – Martin – An ordinance repealing Ordinance 69427 approved February 21, 2013, and pertaining to City public works contracts, Tax Increment Finance projects and St. Louis Bonded Projects, and workforce diversity, and establishing apprenticeship training, construction workforce development, and a Community Jobs Board, and in lieu thereof establishing a new ordinance pertaining to the same; and containing a severability clause and effective date.

The meeting begins at 10am, past meetings and a live broadcast can be watched online here. See list of all board bills for the 2019-2020 session — the new bills listed above may not be online right away.

Next week they’ll meet on Friday July 12th — their last meeting before Summer break.

— Steve Patterson

 

St. Louis Board of Aldermen: New Board Bills Week 11 of 2019-2020 Session

June 28, 2019 Board of Aldermen, Featured Comments Off on St. Louis Board of Aldermen: New Board Bills Week 11 of 2019-2020 Session

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen will meet at 10am today, their  11th meeting of the 2019-2020 session. As previously noted, they have the first two meetings labeled as Week #1, so they list this as week/meeting 10.

Today’s agenda includes three (3) new bills:

  • B.B #82 – Coatar – An Ordinance Adopting and approving the petition to amend the Petition To Establish The 705 Olive Community Improvement District to add property to the 705 Olive Community Improvement District, finding of public purpose for adding property, and containing a severability clause
  • B.B. #83 – Coatar – An Ordinance Approving The Petition Of An Owner Of Certain Real Property To Establish A Community Improvement District, Establishing The Soulard Community Improvement District, Finding A Public Purpose For The Establishment Of The Soulard Community Improvement District, And Containing An Emergency Clause And Containing A Severability Clause.
  • B.B. #84 – Coatar – An Ordinance approving and authorizing the execution of a First Amendment to Cooperation Agreement between The City of St. Louis, Missouri and 705 Olive, LLC; authorizing other related actions; and containing a Severability Clause

The meeting begins at 10am, past meetings and a live broadcast can be watched online here. See list of all board bills for the 2019-2020 session — the new bills listed above may not be online right away.

Next week they’ll meet on Wednesday July 3rd due to the Fourth of July holiday. The following week they’ll meet on Friday July 12th — their last meeting before Summer break.

— Steve Patterson

 

Democratic Debates Begin Tonight: Progressives vs Centrists

June 26, 2019 Featured, Politics/Policy Comments Off on Democratic Debates Begin Tonight: Progressives vs Centrists
Sen. Bernie Sanders speaking at a campaign rally, Affton High School in March 2016. Actor Danny Devito at far right.

The first debate of the 2020 presidential election is tonight, with part 2 tomorrow night.

The debates will be available to watch on NBC, MSNBC and Telemundo at 9 p.m. [8pm central] on both nights and will be available to stream for free on NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, and the NBC News app, as well as all Telemundo digital platforms, marking the first time a Spanish-language channel will host a Democratic presidential debate. (Yahoo News)

Tonight will be 10 candidates, tomorrow 10 more. Four candidates didn’t qualify.

In the recent non-scientific Sunday Poll readers think the last four candidates next year will be two progressives (Sanders, Warren) and two centrists (Biden, Buttigieg).

Q: Of the 20 candidates in the first Democratic debate pick the 4 you THINK will still be the last 4 remaining before the nominee is picked.

  • Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont: 25 [19.84%]
  • Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts: 22 [17.46%]
  • Former Vice President Joe Biden: 21 [16.67%]
  • South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg: 19 [15.08%]
  • Sen. Kamala Harris of California: 18 [14.29%]
  • Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey: 4 [3.17%]
  • Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota: 3 [2.38%]
  • TIE: 2 [1.59%]
    • Former Housing Secretary Julián Castro
    • Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii
    • Former Gov. John Hickenlooper of Colorado
    • Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas
    • Entrepreneur Andrew Yang
  • TIE: 1 [0.79%]
    • Sen. Michael Bennet of Colorado
    • New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio
    • Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York
    • A candidate that didn’t make the 1st debate
  • TIE: 0 [0%]
    • Former Rep. John Delaney of Maryland
    • Gov. Jay Inslee of Washington
    • Rep. Tim Ryan of Ohio
    • Rep. Eric Swalwell of California
    • Author Marianne Williamson

Remember, a lot can happen in a year.

Debating tonight will be following:

  • Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey
  • Former Housing Secretary Julián Castro
  • New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio
  • Former Rep. John Delaney of Maryland
  • Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii
  • Gov. Jay Inslee of Washington
  • Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota
  • Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas
  • Rep. Tim Ryan of Ohio
  • Sen. Elizabeth Warren

Warren is doing very well lately, but we won’t get to see her debate with other front-runners this time.  Not sure if this is good or bad for her, probably a little of both.

Tomorrow night will be the other ten, with most of the current front-runners:

  • Sen. Michael Bennet of Colorado
  • Former Vice President Joe Biden
  • South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg
  • Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York
  • Sen. Kamala Harris of California
  • Former Gov. John Hickenlooper of Colorado
  • Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont
  • Rep. Eric Swalwell of California
  • Author Marianne Williamson
  • Entrepreneur Andrew Yang

The four candidates who didn’t qualify for this first round of debates are:

  • Montana Gov. Steve Bullock
  • former Alaska Sen. Mike Gravel
  • Miramar, Fla., Mayor Wayne Messam
  • Massachusetts Rep. Seth Moulton

Here are some 2020 guides to candidates:

I supported Sen. Bernie Sanders in the 2016 primary — an easy decision given the choices. With so many candidates this time I feel I need to learn more about them before coming to a decision.

— Steve Patterson

 

Sunday Poll: Who Do You Think Will Be The Final Four Democratic Presidential Candidates Running In 2020?

June 23, 2019 Featured, Politics/Policy, Sunday Poll Comments Off on Sunday Poll: Who Do You Think Will Be The Final Four Democratic Presidential Candidates Running In 2020?
Please vote below

Today’s poll is similar to a poll here just over 4 years ago. At that time the GOP field was huge, most picked Jeb Bush as the GOP candidate most likely to be on top. Yes, a lot can change in the year prior to nominating conventions!

The 2020 election cycle is in full swing, President Trump launched his campaign for a 2nd term and more than twenty candidates are seeking the Democratic nomination.  It’s too early to know who the Democrats will nominate at their July 2020 convention in Milwaukee, Wisconsin — that’s the point — to later be able to compare 2019 perceptions with 2020 reality.

For today’s poll will use the list of the 20 declared candidates that met the criteria for the first debate.  This debate is later this week, split into two parts:

The back-to-back debates on Wednesday and Thursday nights could be a pivot point in the Democrats’ primary campaign, which for months has seen candidates refraining from criticizing one another — or doing so only in veiled terms.
It will be a high-stakes test for the biggest primary campaign field ever, which includes three black candidates, one Latino, six women, two Asian Americans and an openly gay man. (Los Angeles Times)

This week’s poll question isn’t who you want to see make it to the final 4, but rather who you think will be the 4 who’ll survive the next 9-12 months of campaigning.

Please be sure to pick 4 answers, the poll closes at 8pm tonight. The non-scientific results ands my own thoughts on Wednesday morning. First night of the first Democratic debate is Wednesday night, 7pm St. Louis time on 5.1 (NBC).

— Steve Patterson

 

 

 

Advertisement



FACEBOOK POSTS

Unable to display Facebook posts.
Show error

Error: (#10) To use 'Page Public Content Access', your use of this endpoint must be reviewed and approved by Facebook. To submit this 'Page Public Content Access' feature for review please read our documentation on reviewable features: https://developers.facebook.com/docs/apps/review.
Type: OAuthException
Code: 10
Please refer to our Error Message Reference.

Archives

Categories

Advertisement


Subscribe