More Than Six Years Later Mapped Chouteau Bike Lane Still Doesn’t Exist

The Chouteau Ave bike lanes shown on a Bike St Louis map in 2009 didn’t exist. They’re on the 2015 update but still don’t exist — but that will soon change.

Sunday Poll: What Should Happen When The Small Bar Smoking Ban Exemption Expires In January?

The 5-year exemption allowing small bars to still allow smoking expires in January. Should the exemption be allowed to expire or should it be extended?

Proposition 1 Only Item on Tuesday’s Ballot

Tuesday voters will decide the fate of Proposition 1.

Both Styles of New Parking Payment on Same Block

Both single-space meters & multi-space meters on the same block, opposite sides of the street.

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More Than Six Years Later Mapped Chouteau Bike Lane Still Doesn’t Exist

Last Monday I posted a detailed look at the new semi-protected bike lane on Chestnut Street, today a follow up to a January 2009 post on the narrowest bike lane. As was the case six+ years ago, the latest Bike St. Louis map (web | Scribd) shows bike lanes on both sides of Chouteau. Some say it had bike lanes at one time, but MoDOT restriped Chouteau and did away with them. What I saw in January 2009 was two solid white lines in the Westbound direction — they remained when I visited again on July 23rd.

These lanes aren't about bikes, they're a way to narrow the outside drive lane from excess pavement.
These lanes aren’t about bikes, they’re a way to narrow the outside drive lane from excess pavement.
On the South side of Chouteau, also looking West from Tucker, we see a wide outside lane -- no bike lane.
On the South side of Chouteau, also looking West from Tucker, we see a wide outside lane — no bike lane.

What

The map's legend shows a solid red line as dedicated bike lanes in both directions, dotted red as shared lanes..
The map’s legend shows a solid red line as dedicated bike lanes in both directions, dotted red as shared lanes..
This section of the map shows Chouteau in solid red.
This section of the map shows Chouteau in solid red.

Todd Antoine, from Great Rivers Greenway, told me MoDOT is starting now to resurface Chouteau, when finished it’ll be striped with dedicated bike lanes. The map available in January 2009 also showed dedicated bike lanes, I don’t know what maps in between indicated.

Given the road width I expect to see a reduction in the number of travel lanes from four to two, which shouldn’t be a problem given our light traffic.  Still, it’ll likely upset those who want lots of wide lanes for cars.

— Steve Patterson

 

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Sunday Poll: What Should Happen When The Small Bar Smoking Ban Exemption Expires In January?

On January 2, 2016 the 5-year smoking ban exemption some small bars have claimed will expire. Now that the exemptions are nearing their expiration date some want to amend the 2009 law.

This is the basis for today’s poll question.

Please vote above and discuss in the comments below.

– Steve Patterson

 

 

Proposition 1 Only Item on Tuesday’s Ballot

ivotedIf you’re like me you’ve received several glossy mailers supporting Proposition 1  — the only item on Tuesday’s ballot.  Here’s the official ballot language:

Shall the following be adopted: Proposition to issue bonds of the City of St. Louis, Missouri in an amount not to exceed One Hundred Eighty Million Dollars ($180,000,000) for the purpose of funding a portion of the cost of acquiring certain real property for, and purchasing, replacing, improving, and maintaining the buildings, vehicles, and equipment of, the City, the St. Louis Police Department, Fire Department, and Emergency Medical Services, and other City departments and for maintaining the safety and security of the jails and improving public safety; for funding a portion of the costs of reconstructing, repairing and improving streets, bridges, and sidewalks; for funding a portion of the costs of infrastructure development and of demolition and abatement of various abandoned or condemned buildings owned by or under the control of the City of St. Louis or its related agencies; for funding a portion of the cost of city owned building stabilization and preservation; for funding a portion of the costs of home repair programs; for funding ward capital improvements; for funding a portion of the cost of paying for economic development and site development infrastructure, and for paying incidental costs of such work and of issuing the Bonds.

Here’s what it means, via the League of Women Voters:

The City wants to borrow $180 million to make significant repairs, improvements, and reconstruction, equipment upgrades in addition to upgrades of public safety equipment, vehicles, condemned and abandoned property demolition and abatement, and numerous other projects. Specific projects include municipal court improvements, replacement of fire trucks, a secure and centralized 911 center, corrections department updates, city building improvements, and home repair programs. In addition the city’s wards would get $10 million for aldermen to share and spread throughout the city’s neighborhoods.

The $180 million bond would be funded through a property tax increase. For example, a homeowner with a property tax bill based on $80,000 (home and vehicle) will pay approximately $28 more in annual property tax. Someone with a current property tax bill based on $140,000 would pay an additional $50 each year. A property tax bill based on $275,000 would have a $97 annual increase. The City last passed a general obligation bond in 1999.

Proponents say that it is time to reinvest in St. Louis. These improvements are long overdue and much needed to continue delivery of critical services, maintain the City’s financial health, and save millions of dollars in annual maintenance. They also say that repairs are particularly needed around the old Pruitt-Igo housing complex in north St. Louis since the City wants to have that site approved by the federal government for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency’s Western headquarters.

Opponents say added ward money, home repairs and demolition programs, work against the central purpose of the bond issue, which is to repair the city’s roads, streets and bridges and to upgrade equipment for police and firefighter equipment.

I voted absentee in favor — I think the positives outweigh the negatives.

— Steve Patterson

 

Both Styles of New Parking Payment on Same Block

New parking meters are pretty much installed throughout greater downtown St. Louis.  These include multi-space pay stations and updated single-space meters. I’ve yet to determine how it was decided which type would go on which blocks. In the 7 blocks I travel to reach the store both types are used.

Last week, looking at the Chestnut bike lane, I noticed in the 1000 block of Locust each side of the street is different from the other.

1000 block of Chestnut: On the North side single space meters, other side multi-space pay stations (one circled in red)
1000 block of Chestnut: On the North side single space meters, other side multi-space pay stations (one circled in red)

I might map out block by block to see if a logical pattern emerges…or I’ll enquire. It just seems like downtown visitors might be confused by two different physical ways to pay for on-street parking.  I still prefer the app.

— Steve Patterson

Readers on Qualifications for Disability

July 29, 2015 Sunday Poll 2 Comments

Sunday was the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disability Act of 1990, so in the Sunday Poll I asked what should qualify as a disability. Before the results, here is information from a national poll: .

Strong majorities of Americans believe vision loss, blindness, or other permanent vision impairments (88%); cerebral palsy (83%); hearing loss, deafness, or other permanent hearing impairments (79%); multiple sclerosis (78%); autism (68%); and epilepsy (68%) should qualify as disabilities.

Over half also believe speech and language disorders (57%), learning disabilities (54%) and cancer (52%) should qualify, though only minorities of older Americans and Republicans are behind these particular conditions being considered disabilities:

Speech and language disorders: 41% of Matures, 47% of Republicans
Learning disabilities: 44% of Matures, 46% of Republicans
Cancer: 48% of Baby Boomers, 41% of Matures, 45% of Republicans
Majorities of Millennials (57%) and Democrats (54%) believe schizophrenia should qualify, while lower percentages of other generations (44% Gen Xers, 41% Baby Boomers, 27% Matures) and political persuasions (37% Republicans, 42% Independents) say the same, bringing the total support for this condition qualifying to 46%.

Three in ten Americans believe depression (29%) should qualify, while just over two in ten say the same of migraine headaches (22%), 17% say the same of morbid obesity and 16% believe anorexia or bulimia should qualify. One in ten feel that drug addiction (10%) or alcoholism (9%) should qualify, while 5% say the same of compulsive gambling.

Perhaps not surprisingly, those who say they or someone else in their household faces an emotional or mental disability are especially likely to believe autism (75%), schizophrenia (67%) and depression (57%) should be considered qualifying conditions. (The Harris Poll: Overwhelming Public Support For the Americans with Disabilities Act, But Disagreements Exist on What Should Qualify as a Disability)

The free online poll software I use here doesn’t let me get into such detail. When reading the results below keep in mind people could select 1-16 answers. I don’t know how many people voted — my guess is 22. If so that would mean 100% think  vision loss is a qualifier for disability. I’ve added a percentage in {0%} to indicate the relative support.

Q: Which of the following do you think should qualify as a disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act? (check all that apply)

  1. Vision loss, blindness, vision impairment 22 [12.02%] {100%}
  2. TIE 20 [10.93%] {90.9%}
    1. Multiple sclerosis
    2. Cerebral palsy
  3. Hearing loss, deafness, permanent hearing impairments 18 [9.84%] {81.8%}
  4. Epilepsy 17 [9.29%] {77.3%}
  5. Autism 14 [7.65%] {63.6%}
  6. Schizophrenia 13 [7.1%] {59.1%}
  7. Speech & language disorders 12 [6.56%] {54.5%}
  8. TIE  10 [5.46%] {45.5%}
    1. Learning disabilities
    2. Cancer
  9. Anorexia or bulimia 6 [3.28%] {27.3%}
  10. TIE 5 [2.73%] {22.7%}
    1. Morbid obesity
    2. Depression
  11. TIE  4 [2.19%] {18.2%}
    1. Drug addiction
    2. Alcoholism
  12. Compulsive gambling 3 [1.64%] {13.6%}
  13. Unsure/no answer 0 [0%]

The key is what makes it so you can’t do your current job, or another job. I’m not in a position to tell someone who is, say clinically depressed, they should be able to work. Besides, I’m too busy worrying about a potential 19% cut in 2016.

— Steve Patterson

YOUR SUPPORT IS GREATLY APPRECIATED

SUNDAY POLL (8AM-8PM SUNDAYS)


The Sunday Poll is now within the body of the post.

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