Sunday Poll: Which of the 6 St. Louis Police Chief Candidates Would You Hire?

 

 St. Louis will soon have a new chief of police. The six finalists include three from within the ranks and three from other cities: • Lt. Col. Lawrence O’Toole, 59, the interim chief, who has been with the St. Louis police department for 33 years. Mayor Lyda Krewson appointed him to …

St. Louis Board of Aldermen Week 27 of 2017-2018 Session

 

 The St. Louis Board of Aldermen will meet at 10am today, their 27th week of the 2017-2018 session. EIGHT (8) NEW BOARD BILLS ON THE AGENDA* FOR INTRODUCTION TODAY 12/8/17: *Note that just because a bill is on the agenda doesn’t mean it’ll be introduced, similarly, bills not on the agenda might be introduced …

Opinion: Downtown Needs More Residential Units — Apartments Are Right for the Times

 

 For my parent’s generation (The Silent Generation) the American dream was a good job, the same job, for life — paying off your mortgage. If you worked the same job for life moving was only necessary when you wanted a bigger place or smaller residence.  The days of people working for …

Reading: The Space Between Us: Social Geography and Politics, by Ryan D. Enos

 

 A recent book explores the the interrelationship between several fields, including geography & politics. The underlying research is fascinating. The Space between Us brings the connection between geography, psychology, and politics to life. By going into the neighborhoods of real cities, Enos shows how our perceptions of racial, ethnic, and …

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Sunday Poll: Which of the 6 St. Louis Police Chief Candidates Would You Hire?

December 17, 2017 Featured, Sunday Poll Comments Off on Sunday Poll: Which of the 6 St. Louis Police Chief Candidates Would You Hire?
 
Please vote below

St. Louis will soon have a new chief of police. The six finalists include three from within the ranks and three from other cities:

• Lt. Col. Lawrence O’Toole, 59, the interim chief, who has been with the St. Louis police department for 33 years. Mayor Lyda Krewson appointed him to temporarily head the department after then-chief Sam Dotson abruptly resigned in April, on Krewson’s first day in office.
• Maj. John Hayden, currently the commander of the department’s North Patrol Division. He has been with the department for 30 years.

• Capt. Mary Edwards-Fears, 57, who is currently assigned to the Bureau of Professional Standards, which includes the Community Policing and Internal Affairs units and the Police Academy. She has been with the department for 31 years.

And for the first time in modern history, candidates from outside the department are being considered for the chief’s office. Those finalists include:

• Maj. Stephen Max Geron of the Dallas Police Department, with nearly 25 years of experience. He has held a variety of positions in the department, including as its spokesman.

• Norman, Okla., Police Chief Keith L. Humphrey, who worked in the Arlington, Texas, department before becoming chief in Lancaster, Texas, and then Norman.

• Chief Patrick Melvin of the Port Arthur Police Department in Texas. Before that he worked in Phoenix and later became the founding police chief for the City of Maricopa in Arizona. He was placed on administrative leave there before resigning in 2016. (Post-Dispatch)

Today’s non-scientific poll seeks to find out which of the six is preferred by readers, their names are in random order.

This poll will close at 8pm tonight.

— Steve Patterson

St. Louis Board of Aldermen Week 27 of 2017-2018 Session

December 15, 2017 Board of Aldermen, Featured Comments Off on St. Louis Board of Aldermen Week 27 of 2017-2018 Session
 
St. Louis City Hall

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen will meet at 10am today, their 27th week of the 2017-2018 session.

EIGHT (8) NEW BOARD BILLS ON THE AGENDA* FOR INTRODUCTION TODAY 12/8/17:

*Note that just because a bill is on the agenda doesn’t mean it’ll be introduced, similarly, bills not on the agenda might be introduced if they suspend the rules to do so. This information is based on the published agenda as of yesterday @ 8am:

  • B.B.#211 – Guenther – An Ordinance recommended by the Planning Commission, to change the zoning of property in City Block 1532, from “C” Multiple?Family Dwelling District to the “F” Neighborhood Commercial District, at 3306 Wisconsin; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#212 – Pres. Reed – An ordinance amending Ordinance 69190 by repealing Section Two of that ordinance and enacting in lieu thereof a new Section Two pertaining to the same subject matters; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#213 – Ogilvie – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for 1216-1218 Kraft.
  • B.B.#214 – Muhammad –An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for the 4200-98 & 4201-99 Harris.
  • B.B.#215 – Oldenburg –An Ordinance establishing a three?way stop site at the intersection of Devonshire and Childress regulating all traffic traveling westbound on Devonshire at Childress and regulating all traffic traveling northbound and southbound on Childress at Devonshire, and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#216 – J. Boyd –An Ordinance concerning certain business license regulations set forth in Title 8, which require the completion of a plat and neighborhood consent petition prior to obtaining an occupancy permit; repealing Ordinances 56788, 57294, and 58645, pertaining to Arcades; repealing Ordinances 56859, 57071, and 68570, pertaining to Bathhouses; repealing Ordinance 62566, pertaining to Bed and Breakfast establishments and codified as Chapter 8.25 of the Revised Code; repealing Ordinances 55051, 61762, and 64299 and any and all superseding ordinances pertaining to Billiard and Pool Rooms; repealing Ordinances 31271, 41524, 49621, 54691, 57494, 58470 and 61095 pertaining to Dance Halls and codified as Chapter 8.32; repealing Ordinances 55784, 57502, 63461, 64878, and 69096 and any and all superseding ordinances pertaining to Pawnbrokers and codified as Chapter 8.72 of the Revised Code; repealing Ord. 56858 pertaining to Public Photographic Studios and codified as Chapter 8.78; repealing Ordinances 57404 and 68571 pertaining to Tattoo Parlors and codified as Chapter 8.97; repealing Ord. 26445, pertaining to the requirement of a consent petition required for certain types of businesses; containing a severability clause; and an effective date clause.
  • B.B.#217 – Coatar –An Ordinance recommended by the Planning Commission pertaining to the Zoning Code, Title 26; requiring that certain uses that are regulated by a plat and petition process under the License Code and Building Code be made a conditional use, prohibited use, or use by right under the Zoning Code; and containing a severability and an effective date clause.
  • B.B.#218 – Ogilvie/Ingrassia – An ordinance authorizing the Department of Streets to develop and promulgate rules and regulations, with the approval of the Board of Public Service, consistent with Chapter 17 of the Revised Code and other applicable law to facilitate the regulation of bike sharing, as defined herein.

The meeting begins at 10am, past meetings and a live broadcast can be watched online here. See list of all board bills for the 2017-2018 session.

— Steve Patterson

Opinion: Downtown Needs More Residential Units — Apartments Are Right for the Times

December 13, 2017 Downtown, Featured Comments Off on Opinion: Downtown Needs More Residential Units — Apartments Are Right for the Times
 

For my parent’s generation (The Silent Generation) the American dream was a good job, the same job, for life — paying off your mortgage. If you worked the same job for life moving was only necessary when you wanted a bigger place or smaller residence.  The days of people working for the same company for life is pretty much over. We change jobs…and careers frequently now. Along with a change of jobs comes a change of cities.

An apartment m the Arcade

This mobility means many don’t want to get tied to one address for too long. Apartments give people, especially young people, an opportunity to experience urban living with little commitment.

From 2015:

In 2013, the U.S. homeownership rate fell for the ninth straight year, clocking in at just 65.1 percent, the lowest level since 1995, according to the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard. First-time homebuyers, young people, and minorities participate less and less in the housing market. The big philosophical debate is when, if ever, they’ll come back and what that will mean for their wealth over the long-run. (The Atlantic)

A mix is good — ownership & rentals, affordable to high-end. The important thing for downtown is warm bodies, getting long-vacant buildings occupied. More than a decade ago leaders promised us a 24/7 downtown — we’re a long way from that, but more residents is a good thing.

The results of the recent Sunday Poll:

Q: Agree or disagree: Downtown is building too many for-rent apartments, should stay focused on for-sale condos.

  • Strongly agree 0 [0%]
  • Agree 1 [3.45%]
  • Somewhat agree 9 [31.03%]
  • Neither agree or disagree 7 [24.14%]
  • Somewhat disagree 0 [0%]
  • Disagree 7 [24.14%]
  • Strongly disagree 5 [17.24%]
  • Unsure/No Answer 0 [0%]

Apartments will continue throughout the city, but condos will return when the time is right.

— Steve Patterson

Reading: The Space Between Us: Social Geography and Politics, by Ryan D. Enos

December 11, 2017 Books, Featured Comments Off on Reading: The Space Between Us: Social Geography and Politics, by Ryan D. Enos
 

A recent book explores the the interrelationship between several fields, including geography & politics. The underlying research is fascinating.

The Space between Us brings the connection between geography, psychology, and politics to life. By going into the neighborhoods of real cities, Enos shows how our perceptions of racial, ethnic, and religious groups are intuitively shaped by where these groups live and interact daily. Through the lens of numerous examples across the globe and drawing on a compelling combination of research techniques including field and laboratory experiments, big data analysis, and small-scale interactions, this timely book provides a new understanding of how geography shapes politics and how members of groups think about each other. Enos’ analysis is punctuated with personal accounts from the field. His rigorous research unfolds in accessible writing that will appeal to specialists and non-specialists alike, illuminating the profound effects of social geography on how we relate to, think about, and politically interact across groups in the fabric of our daily lives. (Cambridge University Press)

You can read the Preface and Chapter 1 here.

  1. The Red Line
  2. The Demagogue of Space
  3. The Demagogue’s Mechanism: Groups, Space, and the Mind
  4. Laboratories: Assigning Space
  5. Boston: Trains, Immigrants, and the Arizona Question
  6. Chicago: Projects and a Shock to Social Geography
  7. Jerusalem: Walls and the Problem of Cooperation
  8. Crenshaw Boulevard, Los Angeles: Contact and Exit
  9. Phoenix: The Arc of Intergroup Interactions and the Political Future

This is an academic book, though the subject matter is accessible to all. Time is spent explaining the research methodology used in the research, easily skipped unless you’re curious.

Author Ryan D. Enos worked as a teacher on the South side of Chicago, so Chicago’s North-South divide, like St. Louis’ Delmar Divide, makes a great subject for study.  Enos is now an Associate Professor at Harvard University. The banner at the to of his website proclaims:

I am a Social Scientist studying political psychology, race and ethnic politics, and political behavior in the United States and other countries. 

The Space Between Us is available locally from Left Bank Books, Amazon, and other booksellers.

— Steve Patterson

Sunday Poll: Condos vs Apartments…Does It Matter?

December 10, 2017 Downtown, Featured, Sunday Poll Comments Off on Sunday Poll: Condos vs Apartments…Does It Matter?
 
Please vote below

On Friday we learned about a proposed 33-story apartment tower across Broadway from Busch Stadium/Ballpark Village. A 29-story apartment tower is already planned within Ballpark Village.

Other recent new downtown residential projects include the 25-story Tower at OPOP at 411 North Eighth Street, which has one- and two-bedroom apartments that range between $1,295 and $2,700 per month. Two years ago, the rehab of the historic Arcade building added 282 apartments to the downtown market — the biggest single addition to downtown in decades.

In recent years, downtown has been one of the few city neighborhoods where population has been growing, as historic buildings were rehabbed into lofts and apartments amid sluggish demand for office space. Downtown’s population has more than doubled since 2000 to almost 9,000 as of last year. (Post-Dispatch)

A decade ago all the projects being built were condos, not apartments. Does it matter?

Here’s today’s poll:

This poll will close at 8pm tonight.

— Steve Patterson

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