Blairmont Became NorthSide Regeneration, Received Blessing of Mayor Slay and a Majority of Aldermen

 

 On Monday I took you back through years of looking into various shell companies involving hundreds of properties, many acres, and lots of secrecy — up to the public reveal in late May 2009. If you missed it, see Before It Was Officially Named NorthSide Regeneration, We Knew It As ‘Blairmont’. …

Before It Was Officially Named NorthSide Regeneration, We Knew It As ‘Blairmont’

 

 With the news last week that the City of St. Louis now considers developer Paul McKee’s NorthSide Regeneration project in default and Missouri suing him for tax fraud, I got to thinking about how we got here. To my knowledge the first blog post about Blairmont was Michael Allen’s July …

Sunday Poll: Any Hope of Reviving North St. Louis Without Paul McKee?

 

 Developer Paul McKee had a bad week last week. In a letter filed Tuesday, city officials say it’s time to face facts. “After a decade, the promised redevelopment has not come, nor is there any indication that it will,” the letter states. “Land lies fallow. Taxes go unpaid. Vacant buildings remain …

St. Louis Board of Aldermen: New Board Bill Week 9 of 2018-2019 Session

 

 The St. Louis Board of Aldermen will meet at 10am today, their 9th meeting of the 2018-2019 session. Today’s agenda includes just new bill: B.B.#87 – Murphy – Pursuant to Ordinance 68937, an Ordinance authorizing the honorary street name, Robert Prager Way, to begin at the intersection of Morgan Ford Road …

Recent Articles:

St. Louis Board of Aldermen, New Board Bills Week 2 of 2018-2019 Session

April 27, 2018 Board of Aldermen, Featured Comments Off on St. Louis Board of Aldermen, New Board Bills Week 2 of 2018-2019 Session
 
St. Louis City Hall

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen will meet at 10am today, their 2nd week of the 2018-2019 session.

Today’s agenda includes new bills on: redevelopment projects, updates to building codes, a new whistleblower law, a couple of bills  that would require a vote of citizens — one would allow appointed department heads to live outside the city, the other would keep the Board of Aldermen at 28 rather than drop to 14 as approved a few years ago.

  • B.B.#2 – Martin – An Ordinance recommended by the Planning Commission on February 7, 2018, to change the zoning of property in City Block 3084, from “J” Industrial District and “K” Unrestricted District to the “K” Unrestricted District only, at 7500-18 S. Broadway and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#3 – Vollmer – An Ordinance recommended by the Planning Commission on February 7, 2018, to change the zoning of property in City Block 4741, from “A” Single-Family Dwelling District and “F” Neighborhood Commercial District to the “A” Single-Family Dwelling District only, at 5201 Fyler; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#4 – Coatar – An ordinance recommended by the Board of Public Service to conditionally vacate travel in 10 foot wide “L” shaped alley in City Block 798 as bounded by Shenandoah, 10th St., Lami and Menard in the City.
  • B.B.#5 – Vaccaro – An Ordinance establishing a Detention Facility Advisory Commission that shall receive public complaints regarding the City of St. Louis Justice Center and Medium Security Institution detention facilities and shall, at its discretion, review and investigate such complaints as well as patterns of issues and systemic concerns the City’s detention facilities and their operation it has identified and where the Commission deems appropriate, make recommendations to the Department of Public Safety, the Board of Aldermen, and Mayor with respect to Corrections.
  • B.B.#6 – Howard – An ordinance repealing Ord. 70475 and in lieu Thereof enacting a new Ordinance to be known as the City Whistleblower Law, pertaining to reporting improper governmental action and providing protection from retaliatory action for reporting and cooperating in the investigation and/or prosecution of improper governmental action; containing definitions, procedures for reporting improper governmental action and retaliation, and penalties; and containing severability and emergency clauses.
  • B.B.#7 – Davis – An Ordinance recommended and approved by the Airport Commission, the Board of Public Service, and the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, establishing and authorizing a public works and improvement program at St. Louis Lambert International Airport, at a total estimated cost of Fifteen Million Dollars ($15,000,000); authorizing an initial appropriation in the total amount of Five Million Three Hundred Eighty Two Thousand Five Hundred Forty Three Dollars ($5,382,543) from the Airport Development Fund; and containing a severability and an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#8 – Davis – An Ordinance recommended and approved by the Airport Commission and the Board of Estimate and Apportionment authorizing a First Supplemental Appropriation in the total amount of Four Hundred Eighty One Thousand Three Hundred Two Dollars  from the Airport Development Fund, into the Airfield, Building & Environs Ordinance 70570 approved July 10, 2017, for the payment of costs authorized therein; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#9 – Ingrassia – An ordinance to revise Ordinance 70736, approved March 2, 2018, pertaining to the collection of administrative citation fines assessed by the Building Commissioner; containing a severability clause and an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#10 – Coatar – An Ordinance pertaining to the Zoning Code requiring that certain uses that are regulated by a plat and petition process under the License Code and Building Code be made a conditional use, prohibited use, or use by right under the Zoning Code.
  • B.B.# 11 – Kennedy – An Ordinance adopting the 2018 International Building Code with amendments, including Appendices E, F, G, H, I and J; repealing Ordinance 68610, Ordinance 68788, and Ordinance 69271; and containing a penalty clause, severability clause, savings clause, and emergency clause.
  • B.B.#12 – Kennedy – An Ordinance adopting the 2018 International Energy Conservation Code with amendments; repealing Ordinance 68792; and containing a penalty clause, severability clause, savings clause, and emergency clause.
  • B.B.#13 – Kennedy – An Ordinance pertaining to the Mechanical Code of the City; repealing Ordinance 68639 and Ordinance 68847; adopting the 2018 International Mechanical Code with amendments, including Appendix A; and containing a penalty clause, severability clause, savings clause, and an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#14 – Kennedy – An Ordinance adopting the 2018 International Residential Code for One- and Two-family Dwellings with amendments,including Appendices E, F, G, H, J, K, M, R, S, and T; repealing Ordinance 68789; and containing a penalty clause, severability clause, savings clause, and emergency clause.
  • B.B.#15 – Kennedy – An Ordinance adopting the 2018 International Existing Building Code with amendments, including Appendices A, B, and C; repealing Ordinance 68790; and containing a penalty clause, severability clause, savings clause, and emergency clause.
  • B.B.#16 – Kennedy – An ordinance adopting the 2017 National Electrical Code with amendments; repealing Ordinance 68831; and containing a penalty clause, severability clause, savings clause, and emergency clause.
  • B.B.#17 – Kennedy – An Ordinance adopting the 2018 International Property Maintenance Code with amendments; repealing Ordinance 68791; and containing a penalty clause, severability clause, savings clause, and emergency clause.
  • B.B.#18 – Kennedy – An Ordinance adopting the 2018 International Fire Code with amendments, including Appendices B and C; repealing Ordinance 69600; and containing a penalty clause, severability clause, savings clause, and emergency clause.
  • B.B.#19 – Kennedy – An Ordinance adopting the 2018 International Fuel Gas Code with amendments; repealing Ordinance 68638; and containing a penalty clause, severability clause, savings clause, and emergency clause.
  • B.B.#20 – Spencer – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for 3452 Oregon.
  • B.B.#21 – Howard – An ordinance submitting to the qualified voters of the City, a proposal to revise Section 2 of Article VIII of the City Charter which requires City employees to reside within the boundaries of the City and thus allow said employees, except for City Agency and Department Directors appointed by the Mayor, to reside outside of the boundaries of the City, and; providing for an election to be held for voting on the proposed revision and the manner of voting thereat and; for the publication, certification, deposit, and recording of this ordinance; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#22 – Spencer – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for 3429-3431 Ohio.
  • B.B.#23 – Guenther – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for 3520 Wisconsin.
  • B.B.#24 – Coatar – An ordinance promoting the use of energy efficient heating through the connection to the Downtown Steam Distribution system; requiring the continual use of the Downtown Steam Distribution System for any development project occurring in Downtown St. Louis seeking Municipal Financial Incentives; prohibiting the Clean Energy Development Board of the City from approving financing for any project that would result in a commercial building disconnecting from or no longer using the Downtown Steam Distribution System for heat; a portion of the net profits be remitted to the SWMDC and containing a severability clause.
  • B.B.#25 – Muhammad – An ordinance submitting to the qualified voters of the City a proposed amendment to the Charter of the City to maintain the Board of Aldermen as body of twenty-eight Aldermen representing twenty-eight wards, and preventing its reduction beginning December 31, 2021, to a body of fourteen Aldermen representing fourteen wards as called for under Article I, Section 3 of the City Charter; providing for an election to be held for voting on the proposed amendment and the manner for the voting; and for the publication, certification, deposit, and recording of this ordinance; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#26 – Ingrassia – An ordinance to revise Ordinance 70737, approved March 2, 2018, pertaining to enforcement of code violations related to buildings, structures and premises in the City; by amending Ordinance 70737, Section Once Sub-section C, related to the procedures for the collection of administrative citation; containing a severability clause and an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#27 – Moore – An ordinance repealing Ordinance 70087 and in lieu thereof enacting a new ordinance prohibiting the issuance of any package or drink liquor licenses for any currently non-licensed premises within the boundaries of the Fourth Ward Liquor Control District and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#28 – Davis – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for the 2647-2651 Washington
  • B.B.#29 – Davis – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for the Tiffany Neighborhood Scattered Sites Area.
  • B.B.#30 – Muhammad – An Ordinance directing the Director of Streets to temporarily close, barricade, or otherwise impede the flow of traffic on Anderson at the north curb line of Dryden, and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#31 – Vaccaro – An Ordinance establishing a four way stop site site at the intersection of Mardel and Sulfur regulating all traffic traveling eastbound and westbound on Mardel at Sulfur and regulating all traffic traveling northbound and southbound on Sulfur at Mardel, and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#32 – Boyd – An Ordinance concerning certain business license regulations set forth in Title 8, which require the completion of a plat
    and neighborhood consent petition prior to obtaining an occupancy permit; repealing Ordinances 56788, 57294, and 58645, pertaining to Arcades containing a severability clause; and an effective date clause.
  • B.B.#33 – Martin – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for the 532 Bates.
  • B.B.#34 – Murphy – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for the 5019, 5032 & 5034 Ulena.
  • B.B.#35 – Spencer/Ogilvie/Navarro/Muhammad/Green/Martin – An Ordinance pertaining to campaign contribution limits; amending Ordinance 70357 Sections 1 and 3, and repealing Section 4 of said ordinance, to acknowledge newly passed State of Missouri maximum limits on campaign contributions and to decrease maximum limits on campaign contributions for local elections as provided herein.
  • B.B.#36 – Davis – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for the 2647-2651 Washington.
  • B.B.#37 – Kennedy – An ordinance pertaining to the authorization of a mutual aid agreement between the City of St. Louis and St. Clair County, Illinois, for St. Clair County, Illinois, law enforcement officer employees to provide law enforcement services and activities on MetroLink property within the city limits; containing definitions; a severability clause; and an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#38 – Williamson – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for 5780 McPherson.
  • B.B.#39 – Martin – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for 7401 Vermont.
  • B.B.#40 – Ogilvie – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for 6452 Nashville Ave. & 6453 Wade.

Whew…long list.

The meeting begins at 10am, past meetings and a live broadcast can be watched online here. See list of all board bills for the 2017-2018 session — the new bills listed above may not be online right away.

— Steve Patterson

Opinion: Eric Greitens’ Political Future Is Dead

April 25, 2018 Featured, Politics/Policy Comments Off on Opinion: Eric Greitens’ Political Future Is Dead
 
Mugshot of Missouri Governor Eric Greitens

Some of you were unhappy with the recent non-scientific Sunday Poll. The poll, like most weeks, took an extreme view and readers could agree or disagree. Without question the idea that just because his hair stylist went to the Greitens house and didn’t leave as soon as she got uncomfortable meant she consented to whatever took place is absurd.

He blindfolded and bound a woman to exercise equipment, spanked her, and tried to kiss her without her consent.

Those are among the scandalous allegations against Gov. Eric Greitens of Missouri that were released in a legislative report on Wednesday that has put the first-term Republican governor’s political future in deep trouble. (New York Times)

I don’t know what did and did not take place in the Greitens home — a jury will need to figure that out. I do know that men can misinterpret someone being infatuated with them as consent to anything they might want to do. When this happens the men think what’s taking place is consensual — even though it isn’t if verbal consent has not been given.

A survey of 185 people published in The Journal of Sex Research found that people who practice BDSM (that’s bondage, domination, sadism, and masochism) are less likely to believe myths about sexual assault, blame sexual assault victims, and exhibit benevolent sexism—the patronizing attitude that puts women on pedestals.

The Northern Illinois University researchers believe they found these results because people within the BDSM community are more likely to embrace affirmative consent—the standard by which only a clear, enthusiastic, verbal “yes” constitutes consent. Since enacting a scenario that involves restraint and potentially physical pain requires discussion, those who practice BDSM typically aren’t going to just assume consent because someone hasn’t said “no.” (Glamour)

In any dominant/submissive roll playing situation consent to each activity must be clearly asked and answered prior to the start — this is to prevent the submissive person from feeling coerced into an activity they’d rather not. All participants must agree to a safe word prior to the start.  This question of consent will likely be a big part of the criminal case against the governor next month.

I was disappointed so many agreed with the Sunday Poll statement:

Q: Agree or disagree: By voluntarily going to Eric Greitens’ house — not leaving sooner — his mistress gave her consent.

  • Strongly agree 6 [14.63%]
  • Agree 1 [2.44%]
  • Somewhat agree 1 [2.44%]
  • Neither agree or disagree 0 [0%]
  • Somewhat disagree 3 [7.32%]
  • Disagree 6 [14.63%]
  • Strongly disagree 23 [56.1%]
  • Unsure/No Answer 1 [2.44%]

Governor Greitens should’ve resigned in January, but he’s decided to fight. In my mind he now has zero political future — the only question is will he finish the term? Even if impeached by the Missouri house, the senate may not have the votes to convict and remove him from office.

— Steve Patterson

 

More Frequent Bus Service Should Begin Next Year

April 23, 2018 Featured, Transportation Comments Off on More Frequent Bus Service Should Begin Next Year
 

A year from now transit service in St. Louis City & County will likely be different than it is today. Metro, AKA Bi-State, has held informational meetings and hearings on their new plan they call Metro Reimagined. Light rail (MetroLink) will be largely the same, the plan focuses on the bus system. Wheeled (non para-transit) transit will be divided into four categories:

  • Enhanced Frequent: MetroBus routes with 15-minute or better service from morning to evening hours
  • Local: 30-minute service from morning to evening hours on most MetroBus routes
  • Commute Express: Regional service connecting Park & Ride lots to key employment destinations
  • Community Mobility Zones: Service areas using smaller vehicles, vanpools or shuttles, or mobility on-demand options

Right now only the #70 Grand is considered “enhanced frequent.”  Here are the routes that could see improvements to frequency:

  • 4 Natural Bridge
  • 10 Gravois-Lindell
  • 16 Metro City Limits
  • 61 Chambers Rd
  • 70 Grand
  • 73 Broadway-Carondelet
  • 74 Florissant
  • 90 Hampton
  • 94 Page
  • 95 Kingshighway

The 73 isn’t the current 73 — it has been straightened out to improve efficiency. This less circuitous route means this line will not go down all the side streets it currently does.

The other big change comes to niche areas — called Community Mobility Zones, The colorful wrap on the 99 Downtown Trolley buses, shown below, has already been removed. These full length low-floor buses weren’t being driven as many miles as others in the fleet.

In 2014 new buses replaced the ones used since 2010

Most of the routes I use will get increased frequency, but I’m concerned about the wheelchair accessibility of whatever will replace the 99 Downtown Trolley. When that route began it used short high-floor buses, but later switched to full-length low-floor buses. A ramp is better than a lift — I was stuck on a malfunctioning lift once. But many smaller vehicles have a high floor which means a lift, increased boarding time, and may require securements due to a higher center of gravity.  The convenient downtown circulator I use may not be so convenient anymore.

— Steve Patterson

Sunday Poll: Was the Greitens Affair Consensual?

April 22, 2018 Featured, Sunday Poll Comments Off on Sunday Poll: Was the Greitens Affair Consensual?
 
Please vote below

Last week a special House committee released a report on its investigation into the affair Eric Greitens had before he became Missouri’s governor:

He blindfolded and bound a woman to exercise equipment, spanked her, and tried to kiss her without her consent.

Those are among the scandalous allegations against Gov. Eric Greitens of Missouri that were released in a legislative report on Wednesday that has put the first-term Republican governor’s political future in deep trouble.

The report, the result of a House committee’s weekslong investigation into an extramarital affair that the governor admitted he had before he took office, has led to intense, bipartisan calls for him to step down. Mr. Greitens, however, insisted that he would not resign. (New York Times)

Here’s a quote relating to one aspect — consent:

While Greitens has described the extramarital relations as “consensual,” the woman, referred to only as Witness 1 in the report, said it included unwanted and potentially coerced sexual acts that she felt afraid to say no to and physical violence, in addition to the threat of photographic blackmail. (Washington Post)

Today’s poll is about this issue of consent. We’ve got two diametrically opposite stories on the subject — she claims it wasn’t consensual, Greitens says it was. .

This non-scientific poll will close at 8pm tonight. My thoughts on the subject on Wednesday.

— Steve Patterson

Pruitt-Igoe’s William Igoe Died 65 Years Ago; St. Louis Board of Aldermen Started New Session This Week

April 20, 2018 Board of Aldermen, Featured, History/Preservation Comments Off on Pruitt-Igoe’s William Igoe Died 65 Years Ago; St. Louis Board of Aldermen Started New Session This Week
 
St. Louis City Hall

Sixty five years ago today the person for whom the intended white section of failed Pruitt-Igoe public housing project was named died at age 73:

William Leo Igoe (October 19, 1879 – April 20, 1953) was a United States Representative from Missouri.

Igoe was born in St. Louis to Irish immigrants. He attended the public and parochial schools of St. Louis and graduated from the law school of Washington University in St. Louis in 1902. He was admitted to the bar in the same year and commenced the practice of law in St. Louis. He was a member of the municipal assembly of St. Louis from 1909 until March 3, 1913, when he resigned to enter the United States Congress.

Igoe was elected as a Democrat to the Sixty-third and to the three succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1913 – March 3, 1921). On April 6, 1917, he joined 49 other representatives in voting against declaring war on Germany. He declined to become a candidate for renomination in 1920. He resumed the practice of law and was an unsuccessful Democratic nominee for mayor of St. Louis in 1925. He was chairman of the St. Louis Board of Police Commissioners 1933–1937. He died in St. Louis on April 20, 1953 and is buried in Calvary Cemetery. (Wikipedia)

You can see his photo on FindAGrave.

At the beginning of this week the St. Louis Board of Aldermen formerly ended their previous session and began a new session the following day. The 2017-2018 session ended on Monday, the 2018-2019 session began on Tuesday. No legislation was introduced — expect quite a bit a week from today when regular 10am Friday meetings resume. As I’ve done in the past, new Board Bills will be listed the day they’re introduced.

Since a new session is starting, this is a good opportunity to review the how a board bill becomes an ordinance:

Workflow
When it comes to passingBoard Bills, the Board of Aldermen agenda is broken down into four basic parts.

  1. First Reading of Board Bills/Referenceto Committee
  2. Second Reading of Board Bills
  3. Perfection of Board Bills
  4. Third Reading/Final Passage of Board Bills

Introduction of Board Bills
Each Friday, Bills are introduced (first read) during the Board of Aldermen meeting. The meetings are held at 10 A.M. in Room 230. The President then assigns each bill to one of 15 committees.

Committee Hearings
It is up to the chairman of each committee to schedule hearings to review any Bills that have been introduced and assigned.

During the committee hearing, an alderman will present a Bill to the committee members, discuss its merits and ask that it be sent to the full Board of Aldermen with a “do pass” recommendation. Sometimes, the committee will make changes to the Bill before sending it back to the floor. These changes are called Committee Substitutes or Amendments.

If a sponsor senses that a Bill lacks sufficient support, the sponsor may ask that it remain in committee while changes are drafted. Although rare, sometimes a Bill will remain in committee until the end of the session, at which time the Bill “dies.”

Second Reading
Once a bill has been passed out of committee, it is then ready for Second Reading at the next Board of Aldermen meeting.
There is no discussion of the bill during Second Reading – it’s simply read out loud.

Perfection
The following week, the bill appears on the Perfection Calendar. This is when the sponsor may stand up and explain to the full Board what the Bill is and ask for support. On controversial Bills, there is often a long and lively debate. This is also the time to make any final changes to the Bill (Floor Substitute).

It takes a majority of the aldermen present to vote in favor of perfecting a bill and move to Final Passage. (All votes at the Board require a majority of the aldermen present except on Final Passage, which requires a total of 15 “yes” votes regardless of how many aldermen are present at the meeting. Bills regarding the sale of City-owned land require 20 “yes” votes.)

Third Reading/Final Passage
One week after Perfection, the Bill will appear on Third Reading/Final Passage. No more changes can be made to a Bill at this point. Each alderman can either vote “yes” or “no.” It takes 15 “yes” votes to finally pass a Bill and send it to the Mayor’s desk.

There is a procedure by which a Bill can move more quickly through the process. After Second Reading or after Perfection an alderman may ask to suspend the rules and have the bill moved to the next section on the agenda during the same meeting. 

Timeline
First Reading = 1st week.
Passed out of committee and Second Reading = 2nd week
Perfection (suspend the rules and obtain Third Reading/Final Passage) = 3rd week
The quickest a Bill can go from First Reading to Final Passage is three weeks at a minimum.  It is not unusual, however, for the process to take longer.  It could be several weeks before the Bill gets a committee hearing, which would slow down the process.

The sponsor may ask that a Bill be held in committee while changes are drafted, which will also slow down the process. 

The best thing to do is to follow the weekly agenda. If the Bill you’re looking for does not appear on Second Reading, Perfection or Third Reading, then you know the sponsor must be holding it in committee for some reason or the Bill is still waiting for a hearing.

The above is from the About Board Bills page. In the meantime you can review votes on bills from last session here.  For example you can see who defeated a bill to create a buffer zone at abortion providers.

— Steve Patterson

 

Advertisement



FACEBOOK POSTS

Unable to display Facebook posts.
Show error

Error: (#4) Application request limit reached
Type: OAuthException
Code: 4
Please refer to our Error Message Reference.

Archives

Categories

Advertisement


Subscribe