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St. Louis Board of Aldermen: Board Bill #122

September 15, 2017 Board of Aldermen, Featured Comments Off on St. Louis Board of Aldermen: Board Bill #122
St. Louis City Hall

Last week the St. Louis Board of Aldermen introduced twenty (20) new Board Bills. Today. only one.

ON AGENDA* FOR INTRODUCTION TODAY 9/15/17:

*Note that just because a bill is on the agenda doesn’t mean it’ll be introduced, similarly, bills not on the agenda might be introduced if they suspend the rules to do so. This information is based on the published agenda as of yesterday @ 8am:

  • B.B.#122 – Conway ? An ordinance, recommended by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, authorizing a supplemental appropriation; amending Ordinance 70540, commonly referred to as the City of St. Louis Annual Operating Plan for Fiscal Year 2017?2018; appropriating and setting apart the sum of One Million Nine Hundred Ten Thousand Dollars from revenues accruing to the Local Use Tax Fund; and containing an emergency clause.

The meeting begins at 10am, it can be watched online here. See list of all board bills for the 2017-2018 session.

— Steve Patterson

 

St. Louis Board of Aldermen: Board Bill #100-121

September 8, 2017 Board of Aldermen, Featured Comments Off on St. Louis Board of Aldermen: Board Bill #100-121
St. Louis City Hall

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen return from their Summer break today. The last meeting, on July 14th, only had one bill on the agenda published the day before. Turns out three bills were introduced that day. So here’s the two I missed on 7/14/17:

Board Bill No. 100 | Redevelopment plan for 5219 Daggett

BOARD BILL NO. 100 INTRODUCED BY ALDERMAN VOLLMER An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for the 5219 Daggett Ave. Area (“Area”) after finding that the Area is blighted as defined in Section 99.320 of the Revised Statutes of Missouri, 2000, as amended, (the “Statute” being Sections 99.300 to 99.715 inclusive), containing a description of the boundaries of said Area in the City of St. Louis (“City”), attached hereto and incorporated herein as Exhibit “A”, finding that redevelopment and rehabilitation of the Area is in the interest of the public health, safety, morals and general welfare of the people of the City; approving the Plan dated May 25, 2017 for the Area (“Plan”), incorporated herein by attached Exhibit “B”, pursuant to Section 99.430; finding that there is a feasible financial plan for the development of the Area which affords maximum opportunity for development of the Area by private enterprise; finding that no property in the Area may be acquired by the Land Clearance for Redevelopment Authority of the City of St. Louis (“LCRA”) through the exercise of eminent domain; finding that the property within the Area is unoccupied, but if it should become occupied the Redeveloper shall be responsible for relocating any eligible occupants displaced as a result of implementation of the Plan; finding that financial aid may be necessary to enable the Area to be redeveloped in accordance with the Plan; finding that there shall be available ten (10) year real estate tax abatement with five (5) years of payments in lieu of taxes or up to five (5) years real estate tax abatement; and pledging cooperation of the Board of Aldermen and requesting various officials, departments, boards and agencies of the City to cooperate and to exercise their respective powers in a manner consistent with the Plan.

Board Bill No. 101 | Redevelopment plan for 3172 Morganford

BOARD BILL NO. 101 INTRODUCED BY ALD. MEGAN GREEN An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for the 3172 Morgan Ford Rd. (“Area”) after finding that the Area is blighted as defined in Section 99.320 of the Revised Statutes of Missouri, 2000, as amended, (the “Statute” being Sections 99.300 to 99.715 inclusive), containing a description of the boundaries of said Area in the City of St. Louis (“City”), attached hereto and incorporated herein as Exhibit “A”, finding that redevelopment and rehabilitation of the Area is in the interest of the public health, safety, morals and general welfare of the people of the City; approving the Plan dated May 25, 2017 for the Area (“Plan”), incorporated herein by attached Exhibit “B”, pursuant to Section 99.430; finding that there is a feasible financial plan for the development of the Area which affords maximum opportunity for development of the Area by private enterprise; finding that no property in the Area may be acquired by the Land Clearance for Redevelopment Authority of the City of St. Louis (“LCRA”) through the exercise of eminent domain; finding that the property within the Area is unoccupied, but if it should become occupied the Redeveloper shall be responsible for relocating any eligible occupants displaced as a result of implementation of the Plan; finding that financial aid may be necessary to enable the Area to be redeveloped in accordance with the Plan; finding that there shall be available ten (10) year real estate tax abatement; and pledging cooperation of the Board of Aldermen and requesting various officials, departments, boards and agencies of the City to cooperate and to exercise their respective powers in a manner consistent with the Plan.

ON AGENDA* FOR INTRODUCTION TODAY 9/8/17:

*Note that just because a bill is on the agenda doesn’t mean it’ll be introduced, similarly, bills not on the agenda might be introduced if they suspend the rules to do so. This information is based on the published agenda as of yesterday @ 8am: UPDATED 9/14/17 @10:45AM with links to Board Bills.

  • B.B.#102 – Davis –An Ordinance recommended and approved by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment authorizing and directing the Director of Airports and the Comptroller, owner and operator of St. Louis Lambert International Airport to enter into and execute on behalf of the City the Trans States Holdings, Inc. Airport Office Building Lease Agreement AL?055 between the City and Trans States Holdings, Inc., granting to the Lessee, subject to and in accordance with the terms, covenants, and conditions of the Agreement, certain rights and privileges in connection with the occupancy and use of the Premises, which is defined and more fully described in Section 201 of the Lease Agreement that was approved by the Airport Commission and is attached hereto as ATTACHMENT “1” and made a part hereof, and its terms are more fully described in Section One of this Ordinance; containing a severability clause; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#103 – Kennedy – An Ordinance to change the zoning of property in City Block 2513, from “C” Multiple?Family Dwelling District to the “G” Local Commercial and Office District, at 3866?68 Windsor Place; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#104 – Pres. Reed – An Ordinance recommended by the Planning Commission to change the zoning of property in City Block 1228.18, from “C” Multiple?Family Dwelling and “J” Industrial District to the “J” Industrial District, at 4115 N. Broadway and 815 & 187 Angelica Street; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#105 – Ingrassia – An Ordinance to change the zoning of property in City Block 929 at 2647?49 & 2651?53 Locust, from “J” Industrial District to the “H” Area Commercial District; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#106 – Hubbard/Bosley –An Ordinance recommended by the Planning Commission, to change the zoning of property as indicated on the District Map and in City Blocks 1078, 1079, 1080, 1081, 1082, 1083, 1084, 1085, 1092, 1093, 1094, 1095, 2314, 2315, 2316, 2317, 2318, 2319, 2324, 2325, 2326, 2327, 2328, 2329, 2345, 2356 and 2347, from “A” Single?Family Dwelling District, “C” Multiple?Family Dwelling District, “D” Multiple?Family Dwelling District, “F” Neighborhood Commercial District, “G” Local Commercial and Office District and “J” Industrial District to “H” Area Commercial District only, at 2200?50, 2201?49, 2303?37, 2346?50, 2500?48 and 2501?47 Benton, 2201?47, 2301?23, 2401?23 and 2501?29 Cass, 1516?30 and 1800?12 No. Jefferson, 2200?48, 2201?41, 2300?48, 2301?51, 2500?30 and 2501?49 Madison, 2201?33, 2301?39, 2500?30 and 2501?55 Maiden, 2201?49, 2214?46, 2300?48, 2301?43 and 2500?44 Montgomery, 2200?18, 2201?37, 2300?64, 2305?49, 2500?14, and 2507?37 Mullanphy, 2200?48, 2201?51, 2300?48, 2301?49, 2500?54 and 2501?51 North Market, 1505?07, 1827?31 and 2407?11 and 2611?19 No. 22nd St., 1617, 1618, 1804, 1814?24, 2517?25 and 2609? 11 No. 23rd, 1514?20, 1700?02 and 2701 No. 25th St, and 2200?46, 2205?51, 2301?47, 2308?26, 2500?48 and 2501?45 Warren; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#107 – Davis –An Ordinance recommended and approved by the Airport Commission and the Board of Estimate and Apportionment that provides for financial incentives for air service at St. Louis Lambert International Airport; determines and finds that it is in the best interests of The City, the Airport, and the traveling public to encourage service at the Airport by new passenger and cargo airlines and to stimulate service by airlines currently using the Airport by the adoption of programs providing for financial incentives for new airlines or new air service at the Airport; adopts an Air Service Incentive Program, for Fiscal Years 2018 through 2020; containing a severability clause; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#108 – Davis –An Ordinance recommended and approved by the Airport Commission and the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, making certain findings with respect to the transfer of One Million Six Hundred Thousand Dollars of excess moneys that The City, the owner and operator of St. Louis Lambert International Airport, intends to transfer from the “Airport Development Fund” into the “Airport Contingency Fund” in accordance with Section 509.F of the Airport Amended and Restated Indenture of Trust between the City, as Grantor, and UMB Bank, N.A., as Trustee; authorizing transfers in the total amount of One Million Six Hundred Thousand Dollars from the Airport Development Fund into the Airport Contingency Fund; further authorizing transfers of funds in the total amount not to exceed One Million Six Hundred Dollars from the Airport Contingency Fund to the Airport Revenue Fund as are required for the purposes of making funds available in part for the estimated costs of the Airport’s Air Service Incentive Program for Fiscal Years 2018 through 2020, which total estimated costs may not exceed Four Million Eight Hundred Thousand Dollars, and providing for supplemental transfers from the Airport Development Fund to the Airport Contingency Fund and then into the Airport Revenue Fund; containing a severability clause; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#109 – Davis –An Ordinance recommended and approved by the Airport Commission, the Board of Public Service, and the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, establishing and authorizing a multi? year public work and improvement program at St. Louis Lambert International Airport, providing for and consisting of capital improvement projects, implementation, administration, management or monitoring of the Airport Projects at a total estimated cost of One Hundred Ten Million Dollars; authorizing an initial appropriation in the total amount of Seventy Nine Million Ten Thousand Six Hundred Eighty Four Dollars as follows: a) Five Million Eight Hundred Eighty Seven Thousand Four Hundred Seventy Dollars from the Airport Development Fund, b) Fifteen Million One Hundred Twenty Two Thousand Nine Hundred Forty Six Dollars from the Passenger Facility Charge Fund, c) Thirty One Million Four Hundred Two Thousand One Hundred Thirty Four Dollars from the Series 2017C Construction Sub?Account, d) Twenty Six Million Five Hundred Ninety Eight Thousand One Hundred Thirty Four Dollars from the Series 2017D Construction Sub?Account, into this Ordinance for the payment of costs for work and services authorized herein and providing for the receipt of supplemental appropriations when authorized by ordinance into this Ordinance as funds become available to continue the Airport Projects; authorizing the Mayor and the Comptroller of the to enter into and execute on behalf of the City easement agreements granting such easements or right?of?ways as may be necessary to the administration or implementation of the Airport Projects; containing a severability and an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#110 – Davis –An ordinance recommended and approved by the Airport Commission and the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, authorizing and directing the Mayor and the Comptroller, the owner and operator of St. Louis Lambert International Airport, to accept a Supplemental Agreement to Airport Aid Agreement offered by the Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission for the marketing and promotion of air service at the Airport for a maximum obligation of Five Hundred Ninety Two Thousand Dollars for the reimbursement of direct costs associated with the projects funded under the Grant Agreement which extends the time period of the Supplemental Agreement for three months, from June 30, 2016 up to and including September 30, 2016; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#111 – Davis –An ordinance recommended and approved by the Airport Commission and the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, authorizing and directing the Mayor and the Comptroller, the owner and operator of St. Louis Lambert International Airport, to accept and execute on behalf of the City a certain Airport Aid Agreement offered by the Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission (the “Grant Agreement”) for the marketing and promotion of air service at the Airport for a maximum obligation of Three Hundred Seventy?Five Thousand ($375,000) for the reimbursement of direct costs associated with the projects funded under the Grant Agreement; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#112 – Davis –An Ordinance recommended by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment authorizing and directing the Director of Airports and the Comptroller to enter into and execute on behalf of the City the First Amendment to Wifi and Distributed Antenna System Operating Agreement AL?263 (“First Amendment”) to the St. Louis Lambert International AirportTM Wifi and Distributed Antenna System Operating Agreement AL?263, between the City and Concourse Communications Group, LLC, a Limited Liability Company organized and existing under the laws of the State of Delaware, and authorized by City Ordinance 69919; containing a severability clause; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#113 – Arnowitz –Pursuant to Ordinance 68937, an ordinance authorizing the honorary street name, S. Sgt. Ron Bozikis, U.S. Army (Green Beret) Street will begin at the intersection of Livingston Drive and Fillmore Street and run northwest on Fillmore Street to Coronado Avenue.
  • B.B.#114 – Pres. Reed/Vaccaro –An ordinance adopted pursuant to Section 105.483 (11) RSMo., reaffirming the provisions of Ordinances 62391, 66691, 67617, 68409, 68934, establishing a policy for the disclosure of potential conflicts of interest and substantial interests for certain municipal officials, and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#115 – Williamson –An Ordinance renaming the City park in the 26th Ward known as Parkland Park, the new name of said park to be Frank Williamson Sr. Park, and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#116 – Arnowitz – An Ordinance approving a redevelopment plan for 3830 and 3831 Boulevard Heights Ct.
  • B.B.#117 – Green/Ingrassia –An ordinance relating to public safety; imposing, subject to the approval of the voters, a temporary payroll tax at a rate of one half of one percent on the income of each individual employed in the City of St. Louis by a for?profit business organization, whether foreign or domestic, employing fifty or more persons regardless of the location of said persons’ place of employment, and any organization which is recognized as tax? exempt under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, whether foreign or domestic, employing two?hundred and fifty or more persons regardless of the location of said persons’ place of employment, solely for the purpose of providing revenues for the operation of the department of public safety, including police and fire divisions; submitting to the qualified voters of the City a proposal to impose such tax; providing for an election and the manner of voting thereat; providing that if such question shall receive the votes of a majority of the voters voting thereon that such tax shall be authorized and in effect; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#118 – Roddy –An ordinance recommended by the Board of Public Service to conditionally vacate travel in irregular shaped portion of Chouteau adjacent to 4001?07 Chouteau in City Block 3957 beginning at Sarah and extending eastwardly 152.04′ ± 82.0′ to a point in the City.
  • B.B.#119 – Muhammad –An ordinance approving the allocation of $215,000.00 from the City Emergency Management Fund Agency (CEMA) for workforce development and employment to out?of?work residents in the City of St. Louis.
  • B.B.#120 – Boyd –An Ordinance requiring public utilities to replace sidewalk squares consistent with the color, texture, and spacing of expansion joints of adjacent sidewalk squares or, if any adjacent sidewalk square is inconsistent as to its color, texture, and spacing of its expansion joints with that of the majority of sidewalk squares on the block, the majority of sidewalk squares on the block.
  • B.B.#121 – Green –An Ordinance establishing a four?way stop site at the intersection of Hartford Street and Morgan Ford Road regulating all northbound and southbound traffic traveling on Morgan Ford Road at Hartford Street and regulating all eastbound and westbound traffic traveling on Hartford Street at Morgan Ford Road, and containing an emergency clause.

The meeting begins at 10am, it can be watched online here. See list of all board bills for the 2017-2018 session.

— Steve Patterson

 

Happy Labor Day

September 4, 2017 Featured, Missouri, Politics/Policy Comments Off on Happy Labor Day
Labor Day Parade in downtown St. Louis, 2009

Missouri is book-ended on eat side by blue-ish cities: Kansas City on the West and St. Louis on the East. In between is a lot of red. Wages & labor, among many others, are areas where the differences clash.  Though the GOP controls Jefferson City the people are fighting back.

From last month:

With the submission of more than 300,000 signatures Friday, Missouri’s right-to-work law won’t go into effect Aug. 28 and its fate likely will be put to voters in 2018.

 The law is suspended, Secretary of State spokeswoman Maura Browning told St. Louis Public Radio. The office still needs to verify that at least 100,000 of the signatures are from registered voters — the minimum to force a statewide vote in November 2018. (St. Louis Public Radio)

If the signatures are conformed, this gives lots of time to mount a campaign to override the legislature on unions. St. Louis’ higher minimum wage has been rolled back by the state GOP, but again efforts are underway to change that as well:

In Missouri, advocates of a higher minimum wage are already mobilizing a new statewide campaign to get a minimum wage measure on the November 2018 ballot. If organizers with the “Raise Up Missouri” campaign gather enough signatures and voters approve it next year, Missouri’s minimum wage would go up to $8.60 in 2019 and increase 85 cents each year until 2023, when it would hit $12 an hour.

Jake Rosenfeld, a sociology professor at Washington University who studies labor and inequality, points to the successful 2014 statewide measure raising Arkansas’ minimum wage as an example of the issue’s resonance beyond a liberal base. (Post-Dispatch)

Arkansas is just as backwards as Missouri, perhaps more. So if they can increase their statewide minimum wage we should too.

Have a great Labor Day today.

— Steve Patterson

 

Opinion: Missouri GOP Gutted Missouri’s Civil Rights Law

August 9, 2017 Featured, Missouri, Politics/Policy Comments Off on Opinion: Missouri GOP Gutted Missouri’s Civil Rights Law
Top of the Civil Courts building in rainbow colors for PrideFest2013

Senate Bill 43, signed by Gov Greitens, guts Missouri’s civil rights protections:

The governor’s signature on Senate Bill 43, for which Greitens had not publicly stated his support, will require workers who claim discrimination in wrongful-termination suits to prove that bias was the explicit reason they were fired. The current standard requires only that dismissed workers prove that bias merely was a contributing factor.

“I’ve met with passionate advocates on both sides of SB 43,” Greitens said. “I respect all of them. I’ve listened to every side. I believe we need to bring Missouri’s standards in line with 38 other states and the federal government.”

The new law applies a “motivating factor” standard for employment discrimination cases, which Greitens’ office said is in keeping with standards used by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in analyzing claims under the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Americans with Disabilities Act.

The measure changes Missouri’s whistleblower laws — including removing protections for state employees — and limits punitive damages for victims of workplace discrimination.

The bill also says employees can’t sue the individual who engaged in discriminatory actions. They can sue only the business itself.(KC Star)

The applies to all discrimination, not just employment. Housing, public accommodation, etc are all changed. As a gay disabled person this is troubling.

Despite high-profile opposition from civil rights groups, a personal friend and Democratic lawmakers, Gov. Eric Greitens approved a measure that will require people to explicitly prove their race, sex or other protected status actually motivated their boss or colleague to mistreat them to win an employment discrimination case.

[snip]

Missouri workers currently need only prove their protected status was a “contributing factor” to prevail in court. For example, if a Hispanic plaintiff is fired for being late for work while white workers show up late and aren’t fired, the Hispanic employee could ask a jury to compare the treatment and contend that race “contributed” to the boss’s decision.

Under the new law, which goes into effect Aug. 28, such an employee would need to meet a higher standard: The worker would have to show that race explicitly “motivated” mistreatment through, for example, written documentation of racist comments. (Post-Dispatch)

To  prove motivation in a discrimination case is nearly impossible.  Therefore, I applaud the National NAACP for backing the Missouri NAACP Travel Advisory, as a way to call attention to what is happening. They and other groups should boycott Missouri until this is reversed.

Readers were split in the recent Sunday Poll:

Q: Agree or disagree: The NAACP travel advisory is unnecessary and should be pulled

  • Strongly agree 9 [23.68%]
  • Agree 5 [13.16%]
  • Somewhat agree 4 [10.53%]
  • Neither agree or disagree 2 [5.26%]
  • Somewhat disagree 0 [0%]
  • Disagree 7 [18.42%]
  • Strongly disagree 10 [26.32%]
  • Unsure/No Answer 1 [2.63%]

Everyone reading this falls into at least one protected class, but your legal options to address discrimination will soon be limited.

— Steve Patterson

 

Opinion: Razing Vacant Buildings A Short-Term Strategy With Negative Long-Term Consequences

July 26, 2017 Featured, Planning & Design, Politics/Policy Comments Off on Opinion: Razing Vacant Buildings A Short-Term Strategy With Negative Long-Term Consequences

Razing buildings might seem like the answer, but the unintended consequences shouldn’t be overlooked.Sure, no vacant building but then you’ve got a vacant lot unlikely to be developed. Dumping, high weeds, etc are all nuisances that can happen at vacant lots. While rehabbing an old building is more expensice than building new, it’s also more likely than new infill construction — especially in marginal (low demand) neighborhoods.

Obviously St. Louis doesn’t have the population it had in 1950 — but that was a time of severe overcrowding. The number of housing units didn’t meet the need. As, mostly Northside, neighborhoods continue to empty out it becomes harder and harder to support these areas. What does that mean? Sparsely populated areas with few remaining structures should likely be cut off so limited resources can be focused on more populated areas. However, doing so will have a huge impact on low-income/minority neighborhoods.

This was part of the 1970s Team Four plan, still widely criticized today. From 2014:

Some corners of St. Louis still have hard feelings over the so-called “Team Four” plan of the early 1970s, which studied that approach. And a similar effort to “right-size” Detroit was scuttled a few years ago amid sharp resident opposition. (Post-Dispatch)

You can’t tear down buildings indiscriminately all over the city and not expect consequences.

When I travel throughout neighborhoods I think about many buildings that people, including the Alderman, wanted razed. Many of these are now rehabbed and occupied. Holding onto these structures until a plan could be put together helps bring a positive vibe to struggling neighborhoods.

This building on the NE corner of MLK & Marcus once had a huge hold in the West facade, but it was saved.
This long-vacant building was rehabbed as part of the same project.
Buildings on 14th Street crumbled fore decades but most survived to be rehabbed, Spring 1991

As mentioned above, people were upset about “right-sizing” Detroit. also known as urban triage. From 2009, early on in the effort:

Today, though, more and more people in leadership positions, including Mayor Dave Bing, are starting to acknowledge the need to stop fantasizing about growth and plan for more shrinkage. Growth is as American an ideal as the capitalistic enterprises that fuel it. So by itself, this admission is a step forward.

It’s way overdue. Detroit has been shrinking for 50 years. The city has lost more than half of the 2 million people it had in the early 1950s, but it remains 138 square miles. Experts estimate that about 40 square miles are empty, and Bing has said that only about half the city’s land is being used productively.

The next steps are complicated and largely uncharted. Moving residents into more densely populated districts has legal and moral implications; it must be done with care and the input of those who would be moved. And what do you do with the empty space? The city is already dotted with big vegetable gardens, and one entrepreneur has proposed starting a large commercial farm. Some people advocate bike paths, greenways, and other recreation areas. Surrounded by fresh water, and buffeted by nature reasserting itself on land where factories used to be, Detroit could someday be the greenest, most livable urban area in the country. A city can dream, can’t it? (Newsweek)

You can’t want vacant buildings razed and not expect the least populated areas to be written off. Don’t want to be written off? Stabilize vacant buildings and work to get them rehabbed.

Just over half of those who voted in the recent non-scientific Sunday Poll also don’t think razing buildings will help.

Q: Agree or disagree: Tearing down vacant buildings more quickly will help St Louis.

  • Strongly agree 8 [18.18%]
  • Agree 3 [6.82%]
  • Somewhat agree 5 [11.36%]
  • Neither agree or disagree 4 [9.09%]
  • Somewhat disagree 3 [6.82%]
  • Disagree 7 [15.91%]
  • Strongly disagree 13 [29.55%]
  • Unsure/No Answer 1 [2.27%]

Obviously, there isn’t consensus on this issue.

We need to have a serious community discussion about the future of this city. What’s our plan — controlled shrinkage or aggressive infill? Probably both is the best way to proceed. This reminds me about an old planning joke about a city tearing down enough downtown buildings for parking, only then realizing there wasn’t enough downtown left to attract anyone.

— Steve Patterson

 

 

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