Home » Politics/Policy » Recent Articles:

St. Louis Board of Aldermen: New Board Bills Week 19 of 2018-2019 Session

October 12, 2018 Board of Aldermen, Featured Comments Off on St. Louis Board of Aldermen: New Board Bills Week 19 of 2018-2019 Session
St. Louis City Hall

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen will meet at 10am today, their 19th meeting of the 2018-2019 session.

Today’s agenda includes nine (9) new bills:

  • B.B.#129 – Williamson – An Ordinance recommended by the Planning Commission, to change the zoning of property as indicated onthe District Map, from “D” Multiple-Family Dwelling District and“H” Area Commercial District to the “H” Area CommercialDistrict for the portion of the parcel known as Lot A on theattached Exhibit A and to the “D” Multiple-Family Dwelling District for the portion of the parcel known as Lot B, in City Block 5520 (401-33 Debaliviere); and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#130 – Vollmer – An ordinance approving the petition to establish the La Collina Community Improvement District, establishing the La Collina Community Improvement District.
  • B.B.#131 – Spencer – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for 3107 Meramec.
  • B.B.#132 – Arnowitz – An ordinance authorizing and directing the Director of the Department of Health, Mayor of the City, and their authorized grantee official, to enter into and execute a Cooperative Agreement Award with the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, to fund the St. Louis Opioid and Homicide Prevention Command Center, upon approval of the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, and to expend funds by entering into contracts or otherwise for the Cooperative Agreement Award purposes and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#133 – Coatar – An ordinance recommended by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment and the Board of Public Service authorizing the St. Louis Municipal Finance Corporation, in its discretion, to issue and sell its new bonds supported by payments by the City and with limitations on the amounts due as City payments with respect thereto, in an aggregate principal amount not to exceed $105,000,000, and, alternatively or in addition, authorizing the Board of Estimate and Apportionment to approve and the City to execute one or more Financing Agreements with one or more governmental entities providing for payments by the City, with limitations on the amounts due as City payments with respect thereto; and containing an emergency clause and a severability clause.
  • B.B.#134 – Williamson/Moore – Pursuant to Ordinance 68937, an ordinance authorizing the honorary street name Frank Williamson Sr. Way, which shall begin at the intersection of Enright and Union and run east on Enright to Arlington.
  • B.B.#135 – Williamson – Pursuant to Ordinance 68937, an ordinance authorizing the honorary street name Thelma N. Williamson Way, which shall begin at the intersection of Arlington and Clemens and run north on Arlington to the intersection of Arlington and Windemere.
  • B.B.#136 – Vaccaro – An ordinance defining “recreational fire” as an outdoor fire, burning fuel other than rubbish, leaves, grass, paper, building materials except for untreated dimensional lumber, or logs larger than four (4) inches diameter, where the fuel is not contained in an incinerator, outdoor fireplace, portable outdoor fireplace, barbeque grill or barbeque pit, has a total fuel area no more than thirty (30) inches in diameter and eighteen (18) inches in height, used for pleasure, religious, ceremonial, cooking, warmth or similar purposes; and providing for the regulation of recreational fires; and containing an emergency clause. [See barbecue vs barbeque at Grammerist]B.B.#137 – Williamson/Green – An ordinance revising and amending Ordinance No. 62885, which imposes a one-half of one-percent sales tax, known as the Capital Improvements Sales Tax, on all retail sales made in the City which are subject to taxation under the provisions of Sections 144.010 to 144.525 R.S.Mo., and providing for the allocation of such funds for the purpose of funding capital improvements, including allocations for ward capital improvements, so that allocations for ward capital improvements for each ward shall be made based upon eachward’s “need”, such need to be determined pursuant to anannual analyses conducted by the St. Louis Development Corporation of the following six data points for each ward: Median Household Income, Poverty Rate, Educational Attainment (percentage of college graduates), Unemployment Rate, Crime Rate (crimes against persons; murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault), and Vacant Parcels per ward; and containing a severability clause.

The meeting begins at 10am, past meetings and a live broadcast can be watched online here. See list of all board bills for the 2017-2018 session — the new bills listed above may not be online right away.

— Steve Patterson

 

St. Louis Board of Aldermen: New Board Bills Week 18 of 2018-2019 Session

October 5, 2018 Board of Aldermen, Featured Comments Off on St. Louis Board of Aldermen: New Board Bills Week 18 of 2018-2019 Session
St. Louis City Hall

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen will meet at 10am today, their first meeting back following their Summer break. Today’s meeting is the 18th meeting of the 2018-2019 session. Today is their last meeting prior to Summer break.

Today’s agenda includes nine (9) new bills:

  • B.B.#120 – Davis – An Ordinance recommended and approved by the Airport Commission, the Board of Public Service and the Board of Estimate and Apportionment authorizing and directing the Director of Airports, the President of the Board of Public Service, and the Comptroller to enter into and execute the“Memorandum Of Agreement for Expansion Of and Improvement To Inbound Baggage System and Facilities Terminal 2 at St. Louis Lambert International Airport, that memorializes the agreement between the City and Southwest Airlines Company under which Southwest will partially fund, contract for, administer, and manage the expansion and renovation of the Terminal 2 baggage claim area and related equipment and facilities; containing a severability clause, and containing an emergency clause
  • B.B.#121 – Davis – An Ordinance recommended and approved by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment authorizing and directing the Director of Airports and the Comptroller, owner and operator of St. Louis Lambert International Airport to enter into and execute the Concession Agreement AL-252 between the City and AvendCo, LLC, granting to Concessionaire, subject to and in accordance with the terms, covenants, and conditions of the Agreement, certain rights and privileges in connection with the occupancy and use of the Premises, which is defined and more fully described in Section 201 of the Agreement that was approved by the Airport Commission; containing a severability clause; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#122 – Roddy – An ordinance, recommended by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, authorizing the Mayor, to submit a 2019 Annual Action Plan to the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development as required to apply for funding under the Federal Community Development Block Grant, HOME Investment Partnership, Emergency Solutions Grant and Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS Entitlement Programs, authorizing and directing the Mayor and the Comptroller to enter into and execute agreements with HUD for the receipt of 2019 CDBG, HOME, ESG and HOPWA funds, appropriating the sum of Seventeen Million, Three Hundred Seventy-Five Thousand, Four Hundred and Eighty Dollars ($17,375,480) which the City estimates will be available for the 2019 CDBG Program Year; appropriating the sum of Two Million, Six Hundred and Nine Thousand, Nine Hundred and Twelve Dollars ($2,609,912) which the City estimates will be available for the 2019 HOME Program Year; appropriating the sum of One Million, Four Hundred Sixty-One Thousand, Six Hundred and Twenty-Four Dollars ($1,461,624) which the City estimates will be available for the 2019 ESG Program Year; and appropriating the sum of One Million, Eight Hundred Twenty-Four Thousand, Six Hundred and Ten Dollars ($1,824,610) which the City estimates will be available for the 2019 HOPWA Program Year; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#123 – Ingrassia – An ordinance authorizing the sale of certain real property owned by the City and located in City Blocks 2007 and 2008 in the City of St. Louis and containing a severability clause. This ordinance, authorizing and directing the Mayor and Comptroller to execute, upon receipt of and in consideration of the sum of Six Hundred Fifty Thousand Dollars ($650,000.00) and other good and valuable consideration, a Quit Claim Deed to remise, release and forever quit-claim unto 2200 Washington LLC, whose address is 1425 South 18th Street, St. Louis Mo. 63104, certain City-owned property located in City Blocks 2007 and 2008.
  • B.B.#124 – Ogilvie – An ordinance repealing Section 4, Subsections 746.010 through 756.040 of Ordinance No. 51871, approved April 4, 1963, and pertaining to the establishment of the Decent Literature Commission, its organization, responsibilities, powers and purposes, codified as Sections 15.32.010 through 15.32.040 of the Revised Code of the City, 1994 Annotated.
  • B.B.#125 – Vaccaro – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for 5550 Fyler.
  • B.B.#126 – Spencer – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for 3521, 3526, 3527, and 3534 Oregon.
  • B.B.#127 – Davis – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for 1815 Locust.
  • B.B.#128 – Moore – An Ordinance establishing a two-way stop site at the intersection of Warne and Lexington regulating all traffic traveling northbound and southbound on Warne at Lexington and containing an emergency clause.

The meeting begins at 10am, past meetings and a live broadcast can be watched online here. See list of all board bills for the 2017-2018 session — the new bills listed above may not be online right away.

— Steve Patterson

 

Opinion: Please Vote YES on Amendment 2, NO on Amendment 3

October 3, 2018 Featured, Politics/Policy Comments Off on Opinion: Please Vote YES on Amendment 2, NO on Amendment 3
The fist legal marijuana dispensary I visited in Denver, September 2014. Medical marijuana was kept in a different section from recreational all over the state.

In less than five weeks Missouri voters will decide if the state will become the 31st state to legalize medical marijuana, Sunday’s non-scientific poll was on this upcoming vote. Here are the results:

Q: Missouri voters will see 3 issues to legalize medical marijuana on the November ballot. Which of the 3, if any, will you vote for?

  • Amendment 2, supported by a group called New Approach Missouri: 3 [15.79%]
  • Amendment 3, supported by Springfield physician-attorney Brad Bradshaw: 1 [5.26%]
  • Proposition C, supported by a group called Missourians for Patient Care: 0 [0%]
  • Will vote NO on all three: 3 [15.79%]
  • Will vote YES on all three: 7 [36.84%]
  • Will vote YES on 2 & 3, no on C: 1 [5.26%]
  • Will vote YES on 2 & C, no on 3: 1 [5.26%]
  • Will vote YES on 3 & C, no on 2: 0 [0%]
  • I’m not a Missouri voter: 1 [5.26%]
  • Unsure at this time: 2 [10.53%]

The number of votes was less than most weeks, but the three tied.  Here’s more on the three:

The New Approach measure is a constitutional amendment that would allow doctors to prescribe medical marijuana to patients with one of ten specified medical conditions, including cancer, glaucoma, epilepsy, chronic pain, PTSD and Parkinson’s. The measure would impose a four percent sales tax, and some of that revenue would be earmarked for veteran’s programs. The state’s Department of Health and Senior Services would regulate sales, cultivation and licensing.

New Approach is the only ballot initiate that would permit patients to grow their own weed, but the plants would have to be grown in facility registered with the state. Patients would also have to pay a $100 license fee.

According to estimates by the Secretary of State’s office, New Approach’s proposal would cost the state $7 million to operate annually, while generating $18 million in tax revenue for the state and $6 million for local governments.

The second constitutional amendment to make the ballot is known as the Bradshaw Amendment, named for the Springfield attorney and physician, Brad Bradshaw, who largely self-funded the measure.

The Bradshaw Amendment is, in a word, ambitious: it would create a “state research institute” and establish a nine-person research board led by Bradshaw himself. According to the petition, the institute would work on “developing cures and treatments for cancer and other incurable diseases or medical conditions.” That board could also determine what diseases would benefit from medical marijuana treatment.

Among the three initiatives, the Bradshaw Amendment would impose the highest tax: fifteen percent. Some of that tax revenue would fund health and care services for veterans. The Secretary of State’s Office estimates that the measure would cost the state $500,000 annually and would generate revenue off taxes and fees, to the tune of $66 million.

It’s worth noting that both the Bradshaw Amendment and New Approach’s proposal are constitutional amendments, meaning they could only be amended later by an additional vote of the people. Not so with the Missourians For Patient Care Act, a statutory amendment that, if passed, would essentially create a new law — meaning that it could potentially be altered by legislators at a later date. (Riverfront Times)

I’m the one who voted in the poll “Will vote YES on 2 & C, no on 3”. I prefer a constitutional amendment to a law that can be easily changed by conservative legislators. Amendment 2 is a well-written measure with patients in mind. A 4% tax on medicine isn’t bad. Amendment 3, on the other hand, is bad — should not be passed. I’ll let another Springfield doctor explain:

In a letter to the editor on Sept. 2, Springfield personal injury attorney Brad Bradshaw purported to “set the record straight” on the medical marijuana ballot initiatives Missourians will vote on in November. The only thing that came through clearly was his self-servedness. Mr. Bradshaw has invested millions of his own money into his own effort that serves namely one person: himself. No doubt he is hoping to reap a handsome return on his investment.

His attacks are meant to disguise his impractical proposal. I want to make clear that Amendment 3 will not lead to a cure in cancer, as Mr. Bradshaw disingenuously tries to make us believe. In fact, its estimated $66 million in revenue is a trivial drop in the bucket compared to our modern-day investments in cancer research and treatment. His proposed “cancer institute” will be funded by your tax dollars but without your or the rest of the public’s well-being in mind. That is because how the money is spent is decided by Mr. Bradshaw and the board members he directly appoints. It will not be subject to citizen review. It will not be subject to MOMA Board certification. It will not result in further investments to improve the quality of life for cancer patients or make headway on future cures. (Brad Bradshaw misleads on medical marijuana)

Follow the money — Bradshaw filed lawsuits to remove the other two measures, later tossed out by a judge, Amendment 3 would give Bradshaw a huge slush fund. Please vote YES on Amendment 2 & Proposition C, vote NO on Amendment 3 — please don’t vote yes on all three.

Still undecided? Check out the New Approach Missouri website.

— Steve Patterson

 

Sunday Poll: How Will You Vote On Missouri’s 3 Medical Marijuana Measures?

September 30, 2018 Drug Policy, Featured, Missouri, Politics/Policy Comments Off on Sunday Poll: How Will You Vote On Missouri’s 3 Medical Marijuana Measures?
Please vote below

In just over five weeks Missouri voters will decide if the state joins the majority of states that have already legalized marijuana for medical use.

Thirty states and the District of Columbia currently have laws broadly legalizing marijuana in some form.

Eight states and the District of Columbia have adopted the most expansive laws legalizing marijuana for recreational use. Most recently, sales of recreational-use marijuana in California kicked off on Jan. 1. In Massachusetts, retail sales of cannabis are expected to start later this year in July. Voters in Maine similarly approved a ballot measure legalizing marijuana in 2016. The state, however, has not yet adopted rules for licensed marijuana growers or retailers, nor has it begun accepting licenses. Gov. Paul LePage vetoed a bill that would have established a legal framework for sales of the drug.

The vast majority of states allow for limited use of medical marijuana under certain circumstances. Some medical marijuana laws are broader than others, with types of medical conditions that allow for treatment varying from state to state. Louisiana, West Virginia and a few other states allow only for cannabis-infused products, such as oils or pills. Other states have passed narrow laws allowing residents to possess cannabis only if they suffer from select rare medical illnesses. (Governing)

Our neighbor to the East, Illinois, has had a test medical marijuana program for a couple of years. Arkansas, to the South, approved it in 2016 and the program should begin in 2019. For Missouri voters it isn’t a simple ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ vote:

Missouri voters will find not one but three different proposals aiming to legalize marijuana for medical purposes when they pick up ballots Nov. 6. 

Some language is similar across all three proposals, but they are not identical. Here are some common questions and answers that explain how each would function.

What’s on the ballot?

Two constitutional amendments and one change to state law regarding medical marijuana have been proposed:

  • Amendment 2, supported by a group called New Approach Missouri
  • Amendment 3, supported by Springfield physician-attorney Brad Bradshaw
  • Proposition C, supported by a group called Missourians for Patient Care

All three would legalize growing, manufacturing, selling and consuming marijuana and marijuana products for medicinal use at the state level. (Proposition C touts an additional requirement that local community support would be required before and after its local licensing authority approves medical marijuana use.)

Proposition C would tax marijuana sales at 2 percent; proceeds would be split four ways to fund veterans health care, public safety, drug treatment programs and early childhood development initiatives.

Amendment 2 would tax marijuana sales at 4 percent, with the resulting proceeds going to fund veterans health care programs. This is the only proposition that would allow for home-growing of marijuana.

Amendment 3 would tax sales by growers to dispensaries at $9.25 per ounce for marijuana flowers and $2.75 per ounce for leaves and would tax sales by dispensaries to patients at 15 percent. The proceeds — projected to be by far the most of the three measures — would go toward setting up a research institute and efforts to cure currently incurable diseases, with money set aside to acquire land for the institute’s campus and to fund transportation infrastructure, medical care, public pensions and income tax refunds.

Under all three proposals, prospective patients and primary caregivers would apply to the state for identification signifying their ability to receive and prescribe medical marijuana, respectively. Those hoping to cultivate, manufacture or sell marijuana products would apply for separate licenses. (Springfield News-Leader)

Today’s poll seeks to find out how you plan to vote on the three medical marijuana measures on the ballot.

This poll will automatically close at 8pm tonight. On Wednesday I’ll discuss my thoughts on each of the three, what happens if all three are approved, etc.

— Steve Patterson

 

 

St. Louis Board of Aldermen: Week 17 of 2018-2019 Session

September 28, 2018 Board of Aldermen, Featured Comments Off on St. Louis Board of Aldermen: Week 17 of 2018-2019 Session
St. Louis City Hall

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen will meet at 10am today, their 17th meeting of the 2018-2019 session.

Today’s agenda includes zero new bills, however, there are two bills on the ‘Perfection Consent Calendar’:

  • B.B.#105 – Kennedy/Pres. Reed – An ordinance authorizing and directing the Mayor, to submit all necessary applications to enter into agreements with the Missouri Foundation for Health for participation in a project to develop a criminal justice coordinating council to advance social justice and reforming pre-trial bail to reduce the jail population, and authorizing the Mayor, upon approval of the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, to expend any funds received by said grant to fulfill the obligations of the grant, and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B#110 – Williamson/Oldenburg – An Ordinance recommended by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment authorizing the issuance and delivery of not to exceed Fifty Million Dollars ($50,000,000) Principal amount of General Obligation Bonds, series 2018, for the purposes of paying the costs of the project and the costs of issuance of such bonds, all for the general welfare, safety, and benefit of the citizens; containing a severability clause; and containing an emergency clause.

And three bills on the ‘Third Reading Consent Calendar’:

  • B.B.#73AA – Howard/Murphy/Ingrassia – An ordinance pertaining to conveyances of title and the recording of such transfer with the Recorder of Deeds; amending Section Three of Ordinance 56141, approved on March 23, 1972, and Ordinance 65038, approved on August 9, 2000, by removing the requirement of the signature of the grantee on deeds issued by the Sheriff of the City pursuant to court order.
  • B.B.#100 – Arnowitz/Ingrassia/Green/Guenther/Navarro/ Middlebrook/Rice – An Ordinance authorizing and directing the Director of the Department of Human Services, by and through the St. Louis Area Agency on Aging, to accept a
    Grant Award from City Senior Services Fund in the amount
    of $50,000 over the next fiscal year and to expend those funds for the City Benefits Plus program as set forth in the Grant Award Agreement, attached hereto as Exhibit A; and containing an Emergency Clause.
  • B.B.#91FS – Navarro/Williamson – An ordinance approved and recommended by the Preservation Board and Planning Commission pertaining to the Skinker–DeBaliviere-Catlin Tract- Parkview Historic District; amending Ordinance #57688, repealing and replacing certain standards for the Skinker–DeBaliviere-Catlin Tract-Parkview Historic District.

The meeting begins at 10am, past meetings and a live broadcast can be watched online here. See list of all board bills for the 2017-2018 session — the new bills listed above may not be online right away. You can learn more about how a bill becomes law here (boring text, no cartoon)

— Steve Patterson

 

Advertisement



FACEBOOK POSTS

Company unloading stuff at the convention center ⁦‪@explorestlouis‬⁩ had the 9th Street sidewalk blocked. The two girls were very rude. #stl ... See MoreSee Less

9 hours ago  ·  

Workers are removing part of the interior of the old Dorsa store front. One said they’re leaving the cool stuff at the back. #stl ... See MoreSee Less

9 hours ago  ·  

Where am I?

ANSWER: North 9th Street where it dead ends at the Stan Musial Veterans Memorial bridge.
... See MoreSee Less

10 hours ago  ·  

Archives

Categories

Advertisement


Subscribe