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Only One of Four Rams-Related Lawsuits Settled

December 12, 2018 Featured, Popular Culture Comments Off on Only One of Four Rams-Related Lawsuits Settled
The Rams played here for 21 seasons

In writing the recent post introducing the Sunday Poll I goofed. A readers comment left on the Facebook link explains my mistake:

You are mixing up 2 different lawsuits.

The lawsuit you referenced in 2017 is St. Louis City, St. Louis County and the Regional Convention and Sports Authority against the NFL for Breach of Contract for not being honest in their statements as the plans for a new stadium were being developed.

That lawsuit is still quite a while from any determination.

The lawsuit settled this week was a class action lawsuit of Rams Personal Seat License Owners vs. the Rams alone, claiming they had the rights to buy tickets for 30 years. Since the Rams left after 21 years, they asked for their money back and/or the right to buy seats at the new Rams stadium in LA.

The settlement in this suit was the Rams paying back 30% of the amount of the PSL.

In my hurry to finish the post I wasn’t as thorough as usual, my apologies.  After the fact, I’ve done the research I should’ve done earlier.

In September the Post-Dispatch explained four ongoing lawsuits:

  • One lawsuit involves future ownership of the Rams’ former practice facility in Earth City, known for years as Rams Park.
  • A second involves fans who bought tickets and team merchandise in the final years of the Rams’ time in St. Louis.
  • A third is a class-action suit on behalf of thousands of PSL (personal seat license) holders from the team’s 21-season stay in St. Louis.
  • The fourth, and biggest of the four, basically challenges the way the Rams, the NFL, and the 31 other NFL teams and owners went about the process of relocating the Rams from St. Louis to Los Angeles.

It’s the third lawsuit over PSLs that has been settled.

The original PSLs were good for 30 seasons, coinciding with the 30-year length of the stadium lease at what was once called the Edward Jones Dome. As such, they would be good through the 2024 season, but then the Rams moved to LA after 21 seasons in St. Louis.

The suit sought a refund for the unused nine years worth of the seat license fee plus damages, and in some cases the chance to buy Rams season tickets in Los Angeles. Citing a Forbes article, the suit said the average price of the original 46,000 licenses was $2,085 per ticket for a total of about $96 million.

The case itself involves more than 20,000 ticket accounts. (Post-Dispatch)

The other mistake I made was not making the poll question controversial, so the responses were far fewer than usual. The results can be viewed on the original post.

Again, my apologies for these mistakes.

— Steve Patterson

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Sunday Poll: Did You Think the Lawsuit Against the Rams Would Fail or be a Success?

December 9, 2018 Featured, Popular Culture, Sunday Poll Comments Off on Sunday Poll: Did You Think the Lawsuit Against the Rams Would Fail or be a Success?
Please vote below

St. Louis received some positive football-related news last week. First, professional football is returning. Well, sort of…

The XFL obviously won’t replace the NFL in St. Louis, but it will provide an opportunity to watch pro football from February through April in what is now called the Dome at America’s Center.

The XFL has a multi-year lease with the St. Louis Convention and Visitors Commission (aka Explore St. Louis). Lease details aren’t known at this point, but one source familiar with the process said the CVC will receive more than the $25,000 per game the Rams paid to use the dome. (Post-Dispatch)

The first XFL games will begin in February 2020, so no direct competition with the NFL in terms of calendar. The XFL failed after one season, many years ago. This time around it seems better prepared/funded.  All teams will be owned by the league itself.

The other good news received last week was regarding the Rams:

The Rams have agreed to pay personal seat license-holders in St. Louis up to $24 million for the unused portion of their PSLs after the team relocated to Los Angeles.

Attorneys representing thousands of St. Louis Rams PSL-holders filed a motion for preliminary approval Wednesday in U.S. District Court.

This follows the news last week that the parties had reached a settlement in a class-action suit filed shortly after NFL owners approved the relocation of the Rams from St. Louis to Los Angeles on Jan. 12, 2016.

The Rams also agreed to pay up to $7.4 million in attorney’s fees and expenses — a figure that will be paid separately from the $24 million. (Post-Dispatch)

In May 2017 the majority who participated in a non-scientific Sunday Poll didn’t think the lawsuit against the Rams would be successful. See: Readers: Lawsuit Against NFL Won’t Be Successful.

I never committed either way, but I did follow the court case as I got email updates over the last 18 months. Anyway, today’s poll is a followup to the May 2017 poll:

This poll will automatically close at 8pm tonight.

— Steve Patterson

 

Sunday Poll: Would a MLS Stadium be a Catalyst for St. Louis’ Downtown West Neighborhood?

December 2, 2018 Downtown, Featured, Popular Culture, Sunday Poll Comments Off on Sunday Poll: Would a MLS Stadium be a Catalyst for St. Louis’ Downtown West Neighborhood?
Please vote below

Last week the city’s development agency issued a glowing report about the economic value of a potential soccer stadium, and aldermanic committee approved a resolution related to a soccer stadium:

For three hours Wednesday, aldermen on the Housing Urban Development and Zoning Committee questioned the prospective team owners and their aids on the many details of the soccer proposal. They wanted to know how much money the prospective owners were putting into the deal and how much the city would be on the hook for.

Team owners said they’d cover almost the entire $392 million cost to build the stadium, although they won’t have to pay the amusement or real estate tax. And three cents will be added to every dollar spent by fans at the game, which will go to the team.

Some aldermen wanted to know how much it would cost to demolish the yet-to-be-built stadium in 30 years because the city will own it by then.

“Some of that stuff was just meant to distract and it’s sad those things continue to happen,” Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed said.

The place was packed with soccer fans; it was standing room only. Everyone who spoke up supported the proposal.

“I have asked countless people in all walks of life tell me the downside of this. ‘It’s too good to be true.’ ‘What am I missing?’ The answer is simple there is no downside,” said Cardinals broadcaster Dan McLaughlin.

The proposal passed out of committee by a unanimous 8-0 vote. (Fox 2)

With the Resolution 180 out of committee, the full board voted on it on Friday:

The city Board of Aldermen overwhelmingly approved a resolution Friday that outlines tax incentives for a proposed Major League Soccer stadium downtown.
The proposal passed 26 to 2, with President Lewis Reed voting yes. Megan Green, 15th Ward, and Sharon Tyus, 1st Ward, voted no. Sarah Wood Martin, 11th Ward, was absent.
“I will enthusiastically vote yes,” Alderman Scott Ogilvie, 24th Ward, said before the vote. “But I will remind everyone that our work is not done making sure this is a good and fair lease.”
 
The resolution is just a first step. It outlines the financing plan but doesn’t create the laws required to secure tax incentives. Aldermen would vote on those later — if, Mayor Lyda Krewson has said, the MLS awards St. Louis a team. (Post-Dispatch)

Now it’s up to Major League Soccer (MLS) to determine if St. Louis will be awarded one of two remaining expansion teams. Today’s non-scientific poll is a hypothetical based on being awarded a team by the MLS. It’s up to you, the reader, to define what “catalyst” means in this context. An existing highway on/off ramp — built for a long-abandoned highway loop project — would be replaced by the stadium.

This poll will close at 8pm tonight. Wednesday I’ll share my thoughts, along with the poll results.

— Steve Patterson

 

New CBS Sitcom To Address Race, Gentrification

October 1, 2018 Featured, Popular Culture Comments Off on New CBS Sitcom To Address Race, Gentrification

The now-classic CBS sitcom ‘All in the Family’ premiered on January 12, 1971. In Meet the Bunkers the family already knows young Lionel Jefferson, he’s friends with Archie’s daughter Gloria and son-in-law Mike.

On the 8th episode, first aired on March 2 1971, Archie Bunker learns his neighbor, Mr. Bowman, sold his house.  Archie, worried Bowman might have sold to a Jewish family goes over to talk to him. We learn Bowman had previously passed around a petition to pressure another neighbor into not selling their house to a Jewish family. Soon Archie learns a black family bought the house, later learning the buyers are Lionel Jefferson’s parents. Watch Lionel Moves Into the NeighborhoodMany future episodes dealt with racial tension. The final episode of Season 1 dealt with the issues surrounding Louise Jefferson inviting Edith & Archie Bunker over to dinner.

The last two seasons CBS also had Superior Donuts, often touching on gentrification of Chicago’s Uptown neighborhood. Unfortunately, due to low ratings, it was cancelled.

Photo: Bill Inoshita/CBS 2018 CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Tonight CBS has another sitcom where race plays a central role. It stars St. Louis native Cedric the Entertainer:

Cedric the Entertainer has been making audiences laugh for more than 30 years. Now he’s starring in the new CBS show, “The Neighborhood,” a comedy that focuses on what happens when a white family moves into a predominantly black neighborhood.

“Like when you get the white neighbors in, this is the thing we know. Like, we know that your streets – the potholes are going to get fixed. White people will call the city on you. Like black people just tell you, ‘There’s a pothole down there. Don’t turn on that street,'” Cedric the Entertainer said to laughter Friday on “CBS This Morning.” (CBS News)

Cedric is not only a star, he’s also an executive producer.

The living room set of CBS’ “The Neighborhood” has a distinctly African American vibe — there’s an Obama commemorative plate and black art on the wall.
The show’s star, Cedric the Entertainer, marches over to his chair, sinking down into a dark brown leather recliner, the same one his proud and opinionated character, Calvin Butler, uses in the sitcom, to talk about his latest comedic project.

Premiering Oct. 1, “The Neighborhood” humorously explores the fallout after a white family moves into a historically and predominantly black working class neighborhood. “I’m the guy that feels like we’ve built the neighborhood up and now I can see gentrification coming this way,” says Cedric. (LA Times)

Here’s one of the trailers:

It’s too early to know if the show will do well, but I’m glad to see this subject matter getting screen time. The first episode premiers tonight on KMOV (4.1) at 7pm.

— Steve Patterson

 

 

Readers Represent a Diverse Range of Ages

August 1, 2018 Featured, Popular Culture Comments Off on Readers Represent a Diverse Range of Ages
Steve Patterson on the big wheel received on his 5th birthday in 1972.

Each Sunday Poll is non-scientific, so we can’t extrapolate draw any conclusions bigger than the number of responses. The recent Sunday Poll results, however, do confirm my experience over nearly 14 years.

Q: Which age group are you in?

  • 19 or younger: 0 [0%]
  • 20-29: 3 [8.57%]
  • 30-39: 10 [28.57%]
  • 40-49: 6 [17.14%]
  • 50-59: 7 [20%]
  • 60-69: 8 [22.86%]
  • 70-79: 1 [2.86%]
  • 80 or olde: 0 [0%]
  • Prefer not to answer: 0 [0%]

Readers come from all age groups — younger and older than my 51+ years. That’s very rewarding to know.

Today is my husband’s 35th birthday. Yes, I’m 16 years & 5 months older then he is. I was driving and about to enter my junior year of high school when he was born. Relax, he was 29 when we met.

I’m Gen-X, he’s Gen-Y. We learn from each other, he helps keep me young(-ish). He also helps me by explaining who people are since I’m no longer clued in on musicians, actors/actresses. etc. He’s feeling old at 35, but I guess I did too. Can’t remember that far back.

My oldest brother will turn 70 in less than two years. His first grandchild, my great-niece, turned 20 last month.   I assume those of you with children & grandchildren understand this, but for those of us without kids we don’t experience them growing up daily like you do. It seemed like one day she was all about American Girl and the next she’s in college.

It seems like my husband and I spend more time watching Netflix/YouTube than watching broadcast television. So very different than just a decade ago. We both like watching React videos.  Here’s a fun one watching kids react to rotary phones.

This was all we had when I was a kid. I still remember when AT&T was broken up and we got newer phones that plugged into a wall jack rather than be hard wired. I love watching these kids try to figure out how to text on a rotary phone!

The other side of the spectrum is elders (boomers) react. My particular favorites relate to the only video hame I’ve played: Grand Theft Auto V. First the reached to the trailer, a year later they played the game.  Don’t worry, they bleeped out “expressive language.”

What’s fascinating about the above is their different reactions and views on the influence of violent video games. If you enjoyed watching the elders play GTAV, later they return to get a tattoo. visit the strip club, go to the beach, and fly a helicopter. Again, it’s PG. I want to have a beer with Catherine.

Remember we can learn from each other, so be open to the views and experiences of those who are both younger and older than you are. By all means, enjoy the package of time.

— Steve Patterson

 

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