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Activity at the Bottle District Site

March 18, 2019 Featured, North City, Real Estate Comments Off on Activity at the Bottle District Site

The eastern edge of my new neighborhood, Columbus Square, has been known as “The Bottle District” since 2004.

In 2004, longtime neighborhood business McGuire Moving and Storage Company, announced plans to redevelop the district as an entertainment destination. Noted architect Daniel Libeskind was hired to design the district. The Ghazi Company of Charlotte, North Carolina is the co-developer.

A groundbreaking ceremony was held on September 27, 2005, with plans for the first phase to open in 2007. The plans called for a Rawlings Sports museum, a Grand Prix Speedways kart-racing center, a boutique bowling alley, 250 residential units, and several restaurants. The first phase of the development was anticipated to cost $290 million, to be funded in part by $51.3 million in tax increment financing.

But that effort stalled. In late 2011, the St. Louis Board of Aldermen approved the transfer of the unused $51.3 million to a new developer, NorthSide Regeneration LLC. The deal would see the previous investment group, including developers Larry Chapman and Clayco, sell the site to NorthSide for an undisclosed amount that documents with the city suggest would be $3 million; all three were to work to find tenants and build on the site. Construction on a $190 million office and residential project was to begin in summer 2012. (Wikipedia)

This area is basically a wedge between I-44 (formerly I-70), Cole, 7th, Cass. The only thing that’s happened was the giant Vess soda bottle got a new paint job in 2016.

The Vess bottle in 2012, before being repainted. The McKee-owned warehouse in the background has since had a fire.

From August:

Six years after developer Paul McKee, through Northside Regeneration, LLC, acquired the Bottle District just north of the Dome at America’s Center in downtown St. Louis, no development has occurred. (Post-Dispatch)

Recently I’ve seen some activity, but nothing to get excited about.

Lots of trucks brought many loads of gravel last month
The gravel was placed on several of the blocks
It was then spread out in places

Workers with large equipment have moved some dirt, big trucks have delivered gravel, which has been spread out on some of the blocks. Looks to me like they’re prepping for use as surface parking. With XFL pro football starting at the dome in 11 months there will be people to pay to park here.

Looking North
Looking East from 7th & Biddle
McGuire’s former building can still be renovated, but the clock is ticking.

The location seems good, right next door to the Dome, very close to Laclede’s Landing and the renovated Arch grounds. Yet, surfacing parking appears to be the highest & best use.

— Steve Patterson

 

The LRA’s 10 Smallest Properties For Sale.

November 13, 2017 Featured, Real Estate Comments Off on The LRA’s 10 Smallest Properties For Sale.
The LRA listing for 4555 Lexington indicates the lot is only 50 square feet! Based on listed dimensions, the lot is over 5,000 sq ft. Source: LRA

Last week I posted about the city’s Land Reutilization Authority, see Land Reutilization Authority Selling Vacant Lot That Is Less Than An Inch Wide. Today I want to highlight this property and nine others to make the 10 smallest properties for sale — out of 151 under 1,000 square feet.

The first nine are listed as vacant lots, the 10th is a house. The following links to the property page, followed by the lot size, date acquired, and value.

  1. 2752 Wyoming St: 11 sq ft 08/30/1973 $21
  2. 5137 Wabada Ave: 16 sq ft 02/26/1975 $16
  3. 825 Canaan Ave: 17 sq ft 03/14/1975 $27
  4. 4419 McPherson Ave: 35 sq ft 02/26/1975 $158
  5. 3327 McPherson Ave: 35 sq ft 02/26/1975 $158
  6. 4544 Manchester Ave; 35 sq ft no date listed $35
  7. 4957 Lansdowne Ave; 37 sq ft 03/14/1975 $141
  8. 5030 Claxton Ave: 40 sq ft 03/14/1975 $40
  9. 3029 Lemp Ave: 41 sq ft 03/12/1974 $160
  10. 4555 Lexington Ave: 50 sq ft 09/26/2013 $1,000

As the image caption indicates, the listing for 4555 Lexington is wrong — the lot isn’t 50 sq ft, but 5,275.68! The others appear accurate, but the question still exists — why does the city own an inch wide strip of land for several properties?Are these just recording errors? How have these been allowed to exist on the books for decades?

The LRA search lists 9,481 properties, including the 10 above. I’m going to keep looking int0 the listings and their marketing of these properties.

— Steve Patterson

 

Sunday Poll: Should Height Restriction at 620 Market Remain?

December 4, 2016 Downtown, Featured, Planning & Design, Real Estate, Sunday Poll Comments Off on Sunday Poll: Should Height Restriction at 620 Market Remain?
Please vote below
Please vote below

Local news stories are great sources for weekly poll topics. The November 30th story ‘Messenger: Mike Shannon takes on the Cardinals in battle to sell his building‘ is the basis for today’s Sunday Poll. Here’s a summary off the issue:

  • Any development at the location of the now-closed Shannon’s site is legally limited to 35 feet in height.
  • This 35′ height restriction dates back to 1997 or 1966 — depending upon who you believe.
  • The property is just North of the Ballpark Village site — where Busch Memorial Stadium was located 1966-2006.
  • If a new owner could build a new structure higher than 35 feet the property is worth more money.
  • Mike Shannon was a player and then announcer for the Cardinals.

The Cardinals offered to lift the height restriction but only if they  get a say in the site’s development.

 

Lots of great issues with this one, this poll will remain open until 8pm.

— Steve Patterson

 

Three Houses on North 22nd Street Still Unfinished

In July 2011 I blogged about three unfinished houses on North 22nd Street, in a development known as Bosley Estates. Last week they remained unfinished and decaying. They’re at 3920, 3916, and the worst is 3912 (see on Google Street View).

Unfinished house at 3912 N. 22nd, July 2011
Unfinished house at 3912 N. 22nd, July 2011
2912 & 3916 N 22nd Street last week
3912 & 3916 N 22nd Street last week

3912 N 22nd St is owned by Jewell 7 L.L.C.:

  • Entity created on 6/27/2012
  • Entity purpose: “Generate profit from the development and sell of residential and commercial property.
  • Registered agent: Kymberly Graham: 2010 Kingsgate Dr 63138
  • Organizers: Frank K. Billups & Darryl M. Bills: 15663 Debridge Way Florissant, MO 63034

3916 & 3920 N 22nd are owned by MINORITY DEVELOPERS AND BUILDERS ASSOCIATION OF ST. LOUIS, L.L.C.

  • Entity created on 1/7/2003
  • Entity purpose: “All purposes allowed under the act.
  • Registered agent: Gary Johnson: 3918 Page Ave., St. Louis, MO 63113
  • Organizers: Gary Johnson, Ken Hutchinson, and Walter Allen: 3918 Page Ave., St. Louis, MO 63113
  • Tax bills mailed to: 625 N. Euclid Ste 500, St. Louis, MO 63108 (now luxury apartments)

Building permits for 3920 & 3916 were applied for, and issued, on 4/14/2006. The permit for 3912 N 22nd was applied for on 5/16/2006, issued a month later.

City records show 4 sales for 3912 N. 22nd:

  • 4/5/2006 for $15,144 LRA/back taxes (vacant lot prior to start of new construction)
  • 7/15/2009 for $2,500 foreclosure
  • 10/22/2009 for $2,500 foreclosure
  • 2/27/2013 for $4,000 as part of a multi-location sale

Four new houses on the block were finished and sold. If I had bought one I’d be upset these were allowed to go unfinished for a decade!  Bosley Estates is named after the alderman, Freeman Bosley Sr.

Not sure which will happen first, these unfinished houses completed or a new alderman sworn into office in the 3rd ward?

— Steve Patterson

 

A Sneak Peak Inside The Lofts @ 625 North Euclid

July 25, 2016 Central West End, Featured, Planning & Design, Real Estate Comments Off on A Sneak Peak Inside The Lofts @ 625 North Euclid

Two weeks ago I visited a building I’d been in many times before. The 6-story warehouse on the SW corner of Euclid & Delmar, known as the Euclid Plaza Building for decades, is being transformed into high-end apartments known as 625 Lofts at Euclid. I got a personal tour from the developers. I previously posted about this project in May, see: Delmar & Euclid Building Will Soon Have New Use As Apartments.

The following are gone:

  • The 70s/80s dated 2-story center lobby
  • Former offices, hallways, bathrooms, etc
  • The fixed windows
  • Freight elevator in SW corner of the building

The following were retained:

  • Three passenger elevators
  • Medicine Shoppe pharmacy

Three of five floors are finished, residents have begun moving in. We took a look at the display units, plus a couple units on a floor still being completed.

I was impressed with the quality/amount of cabinets, the finishes & appliances.
I was impressed with the quality/amount of cabinets, the finishes & appliances.
Units in the SW corner feature kitchens in the former freight elevator shaft, with exposed brick walls above the cabinets. The glass door + transom to the balcony wasn't installed yet.
Units in the SW corner feature kitchens in the former freight elevator shaft, with exposed brick walls above the cabinets. The glass door + transom to the balcony wasn’t installed yet.

Each unit is unique compared to others on the same floor. One bathroom featured a rain shower head, for example. Due to construction, we didn’t get up to the roof. When finished, it’ll be fully accessible, but it wasn’t yet when I visited. Interior parking is wisely unbundled — you pay extra if you need a parking space.

The developers say they’ve had no problems leasing the units, anticipate full occupancy despite rents on the high side. I think it’s important for cities to offer a variety of housing options — at a variety of price points. Purchase & rental.

They leased the rough surface parking lot to the East during construction, hopefully the Roberts brothers will develop it or sell to someone who will.
They leased the rough surface parking lot to the East during construction, hopefully the Roberts brothers will develop it or sell to someone who will.
625 N Euclid, on the left, with 6 floors, is about the same massing as the 8-story building to the North.
625 N Euclid, on the left, with 6 floors, is about the same massing as the 8-story building to the North.

After they get all the 82 residential units finished and occupied they’ll push for commercial tenants facing Euclid. Euclid & Delmar is a corner to watch. If you’re in the market for a nice apartment check out their website and visit the leasing office.

— Steve Patterson

 

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