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St. Louis Board of Aldermen: New Board Bills Week 2 of 2019-2020 Session

April 26, 2019 Board of Aldermen, Featured Comments Off on St. Louis Board of Aldermen: New Board Bills Week 2 of 2019-2020 Session
St. Louis City Hall

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen will meet at 10am today, their 2nd meeting of the 2019-2020 session. Their first was Tuesday 4/16/19 when new members (newly elected & reelected) were sworn into office.

As the first session meeting with the introduction of new legislation, today’s agenda includes 24 new bills:

  • B.B.#2 – Coatar – An Ordinance recommended by the Planning Commission pertaining to the Zoning Code, Title 26; amending Chapter 26.08 of the Revised Code by adding a cross-reference in the definition section for marijuana related uses; adding a new Chapter to the Zoning Code, Title 26, pertaining to the regulation of medical marijuana facilities and including sections on the purpose, definitions, use regulations and site requirements for Medical Marijuana Facilities, to be codified as Chapter 26.70 of the Revised Code; and containing a severability and an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#3 – Davis – An Ordinance recommended and approved by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment authorizing and directing the Director of Airports and the Comptroller, owner and operator of St. Louis Lambert International Airport to enter into and execute the Land Lease Agreement between the City and the United States of America, Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration, granting to Lessee, subject to and in accordance with the terms, covenants, and conditions of the Agreement, certain rights and privileges in connection with the occupancy and use of the Premises, which is defined and more fully described in Section 1 of the Agreement that was approved by the Airport Commission and is attached hereto as ATTACHMENT “1” and made a part hereof, and its terms are more fully described in Section One of this Ordinance; containing a severability; and an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#4 – P. Boyd – An Ordinance establishing a four-way stop site at the intersection of Garesche and Goodfellow regulating all traffic traveling north-westbound and south-eastbound on Garesche at Goodfellow and regulating all traffic traveling north- eastbound and south-westbound on Goodfellow at Garesche, and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#5 – Bosley – An Ordinance recommended by the Planning Commission on April 3, 2019, to change the zoning of property as indicated on the District Map and in City Block 1179, from “B” Two-Family Dwelling District to the “F” Neighborhood Commercial District, at 1500-04 Salisbury; and containing an emergency clause
  • B.B.#6 – Moore – An Ordinance recommended by the Planning Commission, to change the zoning of property as indicated on the District Map and in City Block 1880, from “C” Multiple- Family Dwelling District to the “H” Area Commercial District, at 3614 & 3616 Cote Brilliante; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#7 – Muhammad – An Ordinance recommended by the Planning Commission, to change the zoning of property as indicated on the District Map and in City Block 3399, from “F” Neighborhood Commercial District to the “B” Two-Family Dwelling District, at 1913 & 1925 E. College; and containing an emergency clause
  • B.B.#8 – NUMBER NOT USED THIS SESSION
  • B.B.#9 – Arnowitz – An ordinance authorizing and directing the Director of the City Department of Health (DOH) to enter into and execute an Agreement with St. Louis University (SLU) and St. Louis University College for Public Health and Social Justice (SLCPHSJ) as part of a Missouri Foundation for Health (MFH) grant to fund an Academic Health Department (AHD), upon approval of the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, and to expend funds by entering into contracts or otherwise for the grant purposes and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#10 – Clark-Hubbard – An Ordinance recommended by the Planning Commission on February 6, 2019, to change the zoning of property as indicated on the District Map and in City Block 4549, from “B” Two-Family Dwelling District and “E” Multiple-Dwelling District to the “G” Local Commercial and Office District, at 5505, 5535-55 & 5559-79 Delmar Blvd. and 713-27 &731 Belt Ave., so as to include the described parcels of land in City Block 4549; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#11 – Muhammad – An ordinance submitting to the qualified voters of the City of St. Louis a proposed amendment to the Charter of the City of St. Louis to maintain the Board of Aldermen as body of twenty-eight Aldermen representing twenty-eight wards, and preventing its reduction beginning December 31, 2021, to a body of fourteen Aldermen representing fourteen wards as called for under Article I, Section 3 of the City Charter; providing for an election to be held for voting on the proposed amendment and the manner for the voting; and for the publication, certification, deposit, and recording of this ordinance; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#12 – Vaccaro – An ordinance repealing Section One of Ordinance No. 68605, approved March 16, 2010, and codified as 2.08.430 in the City Revised Code of Ordinances, which pertains to election rules and procedures relating to the payment of taxes by candidates for elective office in the City, and replacing said section of Ordinance No. 68605 with a new Section One requiring all candidates for elective public office in the City to have paid in full at the time of their filing the those taxes and bills for services set forth herein and to provide evidence thereof in a sworn affidavit at said time.
  • B.B.#13 – Davis – An Ordinance recommended by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment of The City authorizing and directing (i) the issuance by The City, of its Airport Revenue Bonds, (ii) St. Louis Lambert International Airport, in an aggregateAGENDA NO. 2 APRIL 26, 2019 8
    principal amount not to exceed Thirty Five Million Dollars ($35,000,000) in one or more series as part of the $3,500,000,000 of bonds approved by the voters of the City in 1991 and 2003; and containing a severability and an emergency Clause.
  • B.B.#14 – Davis – Pursuant to Ordinance 68937, an ordinance authorizing the honorary street name Fr. Biondi S. J. Way, which shall begin at the intersection of Lindell and Grand and run south on Grand to the intersection of Grand and the eastbound entrance ramp to Highway 44.
  • B.B.#15 – Coatar – An ordinance promoting the use of energy efficient heating through the connection to the Downtown Steam Distribution system; promoting the continual use of the Downtown Steam Distribution System for any development project occurring in Downtown St. Louis seeking Municipal
    Financial Incentives; prohibiting the Clean Energy Development Board from approving financing for any project that would result in a commercial building disconnecting from or no longer using the Downtown Steam Distribution System for heat; a portion of the net profits be remitted to the SWMDC and containing a severability clause.
  • B.B.#16 – Coatar – An Ordinance amending Ordinance No. 50258, which ordinance relates in part to the vacation of Russell from DeKalb to Second Street (the “Russell Vacation”) with conditions, authorizing the termination of the fire lane on the Russell Vacation in order that Soulard Second Street, L.L.C. or its successors and assigns (the “Developer”) may build a project on certain land (the “Subject Property”) located at 161-181 Trudeau.
  • B.B.#17 – Roddy – An ordinance submitting to the qualified voters residing in the Central West End Southeast Special Business District, as established in Ordinance No. 63780, approved May 31, 1996, amended in Ordinance No. 64550, approved January 15, 1999, and amended in Ordinance No. 68236, approved January 16, 2009, a proposal to extend the levy of a tax on the real property located in said district for an additional ten years and increasing the amount of such tax to an amount not to exceed $0.85 per $100 assessed valuation; submitting said proposal to the voters of said district at a Special Election on August 6, 2019; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#18 – Roddy – An ordinance approving the petition to establish the Newstead West Community Improvement District, establishing the Newstead West Community Improvement District.
  • B.B.#19 – Spencer – An Ordinance requiring a City-wide vote to approve any proposal aimed at or having the effect of privatizing the St. Louis Lambert International Airport by the City’s renting, leasing or transferring its control of the Airport, either in whole or in part, pursuant to the Federal Aviation Administration Airport Privatization Pilot Program (49 U.S.C. §47134; Section 149) and the Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 (P.L. 112-95); and containing a severability clause and emergency clause.
  • B.B.#20 – Roddy – An ordinance repealing paragraph (f) of Section Two of Ordinance 63780, approved on May 31, 1996, as amended in Ordinance 64550, approved January 15, 1999, and Ordinance 68236 approved January 16, 2009 and in lieu thereof a new paragraph (f) is enacted extending the period of time during which the Central West End Southeast Special Business District shall be permitted to collect a tax within the boundaries of the district and increasing the amount of such tax to an amount not to exceed $0.85 per $100.00 of assessed valuation of all real property within such district and to amend and restate the use for which the additional revenue produced by such tax may be put to include cleaning, landscaping and maintenance, security and public safety, purchase and installation of public infrastructure, public transportation, administration, and contingency fund for such categories; and containing effectiveness and emergency clauses.
  • B.B.#21 – Cohn/Clark-Hubbard – An ordinance approved and recommended by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment approving and authorizing the execution and delivery of an Operating Lease Agreement of the property known as the West End Community Center between the City of St. Louis, as lessor, and Demetrious Johnson Charitable Foundation, Inc., as lessee; with an emergency provision.
  • B.B.#22 – Howard – An ordinance pertaining to parking within the “5347 Nottingham Parking District;” establishing the location and restrictions for curb parking in the restricted parking zone within the “5647 Nottingham Parking District;” authorizing the placement of Permit Parking Only signs within the District; and prohibiting the parking, within the District, of any vehicle which does not display the authorized permit; containing definitions, a penalty clause and an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#23 – Middlebrook – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for 1920 North Broadway.
  • B.B.#24 – Vollmer – An ordinance to provide for the borrowing of funds in anticipation of the collection of tax payments levied by the City for deposit in its General Revenue Fund for the calendar year ending December 31, 2019 and remaining uncollected and other revenues remaining to be collected and deposited in the General Revenue Fund for fiscal year ending June 30, 2020; and containing an emergency clause.
  • B.B.#25 – Guenther – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for 3230 Oregon.
  • B.B.#26 – Guenther – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for 2911-2915 Ohio.

The meeting begins at 10am, past meetings and a live broadcast can be watched online here. See list of all board bills for the 2019-2020 session — the new bills listed above may not be online right away.

— Steve Patterson

 

Board of Aldermen End 2018-19 Session Today, Begin 2019-20 Session Tomorrow

April 15, 2019 Board of Aldermen, Featured Comments Off on Board of Aldermen End 2018-19 Session Today, Begin 2019-20 Session Tomorrow
St. Louis City Hall

When the St. Louis Board of Aldermen are in session they typically meet at 10am on Friday mornings. Their last meeting was February 1st, breaking for Spring elections.

This week they’ll meet today & tomorrow, but not Friday. Today is the last day of the 2018-2019 session, known as Sine Die. Tomorrow is the first meeting of the 2019-2020 session.

Today’s agenda includes wrapping up legislation from the 2019-2019 session, final consent to many bills. Also on the agenda is a long list of courtesy  resolutions, political thank yous.

One is worth noting.

Res.#296 – Ingrassia – The Board of Aldermen wishes our colleague Scott Ogilvie much success in his future endeavors.

Scott Ogilvie decided not to seek a 3rd term, today is his last day as an Alderman. Terry Kennedy’s last day as an alderman is today, he also didn’t seek another term. Kennedy will become the Board’s new Clerk. Their replacements, and others re-elected, will be sworn into office tomorrow.

Friday morning meetings resume next week on the 26th or May 3rd, per today’s & tomorrow’s agendas, respectively.

— Steve Patterson

 

Challengers Unable To Overcome the Power of Incumbency

March 8, 2019 Board of Aldermen, Featured, Politics/Policy Comments Off on Challengers Unable To Overcome the Power of Incumbency
St. Louis City Hall

Tuesday’s partisan primary is over, next up the candidates from all the parties will face off in the April 2nd general election. Oh right, the Democratic primary is THE election. Next month a few of us will vote again, for the school board. If St  louis elected nonpartisan officials we could eliminate one of two low-turnout elections held one month apart.

Only three of the 15 seats on Tuesday were open seats, one was vacant and two incumbents decided not to seek an additional term.

18th Ward:

  • Only 17% of registered voters participated in the 5-way race for an open seat.
  • Winner Jesse Todd received 38.84% of the vote.
  • Ald. Terry Kennedy decided not to run again.

24th Ward:

  • 21.2% of those registered voted in the 5-way race.
  • Attorney Bret Narayan won a majority of the votes with 55.54% selecting him.
  • Former Ald. Tom Bauer came in 2nd with 16.6%. Whew, thankful he didn’t win. Two independent candidates have filed to run in April, a good plan in case Bauer had won the Democratic nomination.
  • Ald. Scott Ogilvie didn’t run for re-election.

26th Ward:

  • Twenty percent of registered voters cast ballots in this 3-way race.
  • Shameem Hubbard, wife of Rodney Hubbard, won with only 36.73% of the votes.
  • Ald. Frank Williamson resigned after accepting a job in the Treasurer’s office.

Now for the 12 seats where the incumbent won another term. Note that there were a few incumbents I wanted to see win, more I wanted to lose:

2nd Ward:

  • Lisa Middlebrook was re-elected, turnout was 15.9%

4th Ward:

  • Sam Moore won another term, voter turnout was 14.9%

6th Ward:

  • Christine Ingrassia survived the 4-way race with 44.26%, Debra Carnahan came in 2nd place with 27.84%. Turnout was 25.5%.

8th Ward:

  • Annie Rice was re-elected in the 2-way race with nearly seventky percent of the vote, turnout was relatively high: 28%.

10th Ward:

  • Joe Vollmer easily defeated the challenger, with over sixty percent of the votes. Turnout was 21.8%.

12th Ward:

  • Larry Arnowitz crushed his two challengers with 74.33%. Voter turnout was 21.9%.

14th Ward:

  • Carol Howard will have another term with 52.01% to her challenger’s 47.99%. Turnout was 20.6%.

16th Ward:

  • Thomas Oldenburg was unchallenged, turnout was 21.9%.

20th Ward:

  • Cara Spencer defeated her challenger with 69.55%, voter turnout was 17.6%

22nd Ward:

  • Jeffrey Boyd was re-elected with over sixty percent of the votes, turnout was 16.2%.

28th Ward:

  • Heather Navarro wasn’t challenged, voter turnout was 19%.

Board of Aldermen President:

  • Lewis Reed was re-elected to a fourth term in the 4-way race with only 35.63% of the vote, citywide turnout this election was 17.83%.
  • State Sen. Jamilah Nasheed came in 2nd with 31.6%, Ald. Megan Green 3rd with 31.19%, and Jimmie Mathews a very distant 4th with 1.57%.
  • Over 200 people who voted in the democratic primary didn’t vote in this race.
  • Post-Dispatch: “Lewis Reed won only five of the city’s 28 wards in Tuesday’s Democratic primary race for president of the city’s Board of Aldermen, but those victories came in historically high voting areas, providing enough support for him to prevail in a close battle with two opponents.

    By comparison, state Sen. Jamilah Nasheed won 13 wards, dominating the north side. Alderman Megan Ellyia Green won 10, with a strong showing in the central part of the city including her Tower Grove South neighborhood.

    Despite Nasheed’s and Green’s faring well geographically, it was the turnout in the wards Reed won that made the difference.”

Only two races, with three or more candidates, did the winner get a plurality of the votes cast. Four races the winner didn’t get more than 50%. In many places these races would have a runoff election between the top two. Still, in other places they’d have an instant runoff, also known as Ranked-Choice Voting.

A ranked-choice voting system (RCV) is an electoral system in which voters rank candidates by preference on their ballots. If a candidate wins a majority of first-preference votes, he or she is declared the winner. If no candidate wins a majority of first-preference votes, the candidate with the fewest first-preference votes is eliminated. First-preference votes cast for the failed candidate are eliminated, lifting the second-preference choices indicated on those ballots. A new tally is conducted to determine whether any candidate has won a majority of the adjusted votes. The process is repeated until a candidate wins an outright majority. This system is sometimes referred to as an instant runoff voting system. (Ballotpedia)

This video explains RCV:

The ultimate winner might be the same, or not. It just depends on how voters ranked the candidates after their 1st choice. It eliminates the perception of the third candidate as a spoiler.

RCV would be especially helpful in highly crowded races, like the 2020 Democratic presidential primary.

— Steve Patterson

 

Ugly Local Primary To Be Held On Tuesday

March 1, 2019 Board of Aldermen, Featured, Politics/Policy Comments Off on Ugly Local Primary To Be Held On Tuesday

St. Louis’ partisan primary will be held Tuesday. However, though we have a general election a month later, the Democratic primary is THE election. The even-numbered wards are electing Aldermen and the entire city is electing the President of the Board of Aldernen.

In my view, this election cycle has been uglier than usual. The a accusations between candidates, bickering among supporters online, is the ugly I’m talking about. Maybe past elections were just as bad?

Four years ago the turnout was less than 10%. Embarrassing, but a competitive citywide race should increase turnout. I predict turnout will be under 15% — prove me wrong!

Be sure to vote Tuesday, the polls will be open 6am-7pm.

— Steve Patterson

 

Four Candidates In Democratic Primary to be President of the Board of Aldermen

February 15, 2019 Board of Aldermen, Featured, Politics/Policy Comments Off on Four Candidates In Democratic Primary to be President of the Board of Aldermen
St. Louis City Hall

Today’s post is for those who’ve not made a decision about who to vote for in the 4-way race for the Democratic nomination to be president of the Board of Aldermen. The partisan primary will be March 5th, the winner will very likely easily defeat the Green Party nominee the general election on April 2nd.

If St. Louis government were a game of chess, the president of the Board of Aldermen would be the queen. It is a unique position: Empowered in both the city’s legislative and executive branches, the board president can wield power both in offense and defense. It’s equally capable of holding its own in a fight or just holding ground against an advancing opponent. (Riverfront Times)

To assist with your pre-voting research, here are the four candidates in the Democratic primary, listed here in reverse ballot order, with relevant links:

Jimmie Matthews:

Lewis Reed:

Megan Ellyia Green

Jamilah Nasheed

I personally enjoy seeing competitive challengers, not a fan of incumbents easily winning another 4 year term just because challengers are too timid to take on the power of incumbency.

I’d always heard the phrase “It’s not what you know, but who you know.” When I was younger I didn’t connect that to elections, but it’s very true.  I know the top 3 candidates, as well as people working on their campaigns.  Social media plays a role these days.

I’ve already voted absentee, but I voted based on my favorability of the candidates and their policy positions. I’m not going to say who I voted for, I will say it wasn’t Matthews. Hopefully each of you have made up your mind, or will use some criteria to make a selection before Tuesday March 5th.

In the 2015 race the voter turnout was less than 10%. Given the competitive citywide race the turnout should be in double digits, but it was less than 15% in 2007 — the last year of a competitive primary for President of the Board of Aldermen.  Your vote can make a big difference this year — VOTE!

— Steve Patterson

 

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