Corrections to the Mill Creek Valley Narrative

 

 I feel the need to correct the record regarding Mill Creek Valley, to counter the false information being repeated. Though St. Louis was founded in 1764 it wasn’t incorporated until 1823. At that time “the city limits were expanded west to Seventh Street and north and south by approximately 5 …

A Look at City Foundry St. Louis…in August 2013

 

 In August 2013 the vacant brake foundry in Midtown St. Louis, Vandeventer Ave. & Forest Park Ave., was an “eye sore” just south the main campus of Saint Louis University.  IKEA’s announcement to build on the opposite side of Vandeventer was still a few months away. I visited the foundry …

New (ish) Book — ‘New Mobilities: Smart Planning for Transportation Technologies’ by Todd Litman

 

 Mobility is very important to our lives, and humankind continues to consider new/different modes of transportation. Both of my grandfathers were born in simpler times: 1886 & 1899. The latter was my maternal grandfather, he lived until the age of 97. He saw and experienced many forms of mobility in …

Research Notes on the History of Grocery Stores in St. Louis, 35 Years Since Kroger Closed

 

 After visiting the newest grocery store in St. Louis last week, I took a deep dive into the history of grocery stores in St. Louis, spending hours in Post-Dispatch archives through the St. Louis Public Library website. I’ll write about the new store soon, but today is my research incomplete …

Recent Articles:

Sunday Poll: Should the Size of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen Stay at 28 or be cut to 14?

November 17, 2019 Board of Aldermen, Featured, Politics/Policy, Sunday Poll Comments Off on Sunday Poll: Should the Size of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen Stay at 28 or be cut to 14?
 
Please vote below

St. Louis voters have made some  notoriously bad decisions at the polls — the 1876 “divorce” from St. Louis County topping the list, the 1916 pro-segregation vote a close second.

Back in 2012, city voters passed a measure cutting the Wards and Aldermen in half to 14. The measure takes effect in 2022. Mayor Lyda Krewson opposes a re-vote; she already threatened to veto a similar bill last year. (Fox2)

Some think the 2012 measure was another bad decision, while others think having a new vote to reverse that outcome would be a bad decision.

This is the subject of today’s poll:

This poll will close at 8pm tonight, my thoughts and results on Wednesday.

— Steve Patterson

St. Louis Board of Aldermen: New Board Bills Week 23 of 2019-2020 Session

November 15, 2019 Board of Aldermen, Featured Comments Off on St. Louis Board of Aldermen: New Board Bills Week 23 of 2019-2020 Session
 

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen meet at 10am today, their 15th meeting of the 2019-2020 session. As previously noted, they have the first two meetings labeled as Week #1, so they list this as week/meeting 22.

Today’s agenda includes thirteen (13) new bills.

  • B.B.#155 – Guenther – An Ordinance recommended by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment authorizing The City of St. Louis, Missouri to issue its Taxable Industrial Development Revenue Bonds in one or more series in a total principal amount of not to exceed $100,000,000 for the purpose of providing funds to pay the costs of acquiring, constructing, improving and equipping an industrial development project in the City; approving a plan for such project; authorizing and directing the Mayor and the Comptroller to execute certain documents related thereto; and authorizing and directing the taking of other actions and approval and execution of other documents as are necessary or desirable to carry out and comply with the intent hereof.
  • B.B.#156 – Hubbard – An Ordinance recommended by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment authorizing The City of St. Louis, Missouri to issue its Taxable Industrial Development Revenue Bonds in one or more series in a total principal amount of not to exceed $50,000,000 for the purpose of providing funds to pay the costs of acquiring, constructing, improving and equipping an industrial development project in the City; approving a plan for such project; authorizing and directing the Mayor and the Comptroller to execute certain documents related thereto; and authorizing and directing the taking of other actions and approval and execution of other documents as are necessary or desirable to carry out and comply with the intent hereof.
  • B.B.#157 – Hubbard – An Ordinance authorizing the execution of a redevelopment agreement between The City of St. Louis, Missouri and 900 N. Tucker Building, LLC; prescribing the form and details of said agreement; authorizing other related actions in connection with such agreement; and containing a severability clause.
  • B.B#158 – Hubbard – An Ordinance recommended by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment authorizing and directing the issuance and delivery of not to exceed $11,850,000 plus issuance costs principal amount of tax increment revenue notes (900 N. Tucker Blvd. Redevelopment Project) Series 20__-A/B, of The City of St. Louis, Missouri; prescribing the form and details of such notes and the covenants and agreements made by the City to facilitate and protect the payment thereof; prescribing other matters relating thereto, and containing a severability clause.
  • B.B.#159 – Hubbard – An Ordinance designating a portion of The City of St. Louis, Missouri as a redevelopment area known as the 900 N. Tucker Blvd Redevelopment Area pursuant to the Real Property Tax Increment Allocation Redevelopment Act; adopting and approving a redevelopment plan, adopting and approving a redevelopment project with respect thereto; adopting tax increment financing within the redevelopment area; making findings with respect thereto; establishing the 900 N. Tucker Blvd Special Allocation Fund; authorizing certain actions by City officials; and containing a severability clause.
  • B.B.#160 – Roddy – An Ordinance amending Ordinance No. 70599; approving and authorizing the execution of a redevelopment agreement between The City of St. Louis, Missouri and Vertical Realty Advisors, LLC; authorizing other related actions in connection with such agreement; and containing a severability clause.
  • B.B.#161 – Roddy – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan dated October 22, 2019 for the 4915-4925 West Pine Blvd. Area
  • B.B#162 Roddy – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan dated November 6, 2019 for the 4565-4591 Mcree Ave. Area
  • B.B.#163 – Hubbard – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for the 2127 N. 11th St. Area.
  • B.B.#164 – Roddy – An ordinance dissolving the Special Allocation Funds for Lafayette Square Historic District and 5700 Arsenal and terminating the designation of a portion of the City of St. Louis, Missouri as redevelopment areas and authorizing certain actions relating thereto.
  • B.B.#165 – Roddy – An ordinance dissolving the Special Allocation Funds for the Hadley Dean Building Redevelopment Area and terminating the designation of certain respective portions of the City of St. Louis, Missouri relating to that redevelopment area and authorizing certain actions relating thereto.
  • B.B.#166 – Spencer – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for the 3400 Chippewa and 3809 Louisiana Ave Area.
  • B.B.#167 – Spencer – An ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan for the 3426 South Compton Ave Area.

The meeting begins at 10am, past meetings and a live broadcast can be watched online here. See list of all board bills for the 2019-2020 session — the new bills listed above may not be online right away.

— Steve Patterson

Awaiting NCAA Rules on Collegiate Athletes Getting Paid for their Image, Likeness

November 13, 2019 Education, Featured, Popular Culture Comments Off on Awaiting NCAA Rules on Collegiate Athletes Getting Paid for their Image, Likeness
 

During part of my undergraduate days, mid-late 1980s, I worked part-time at Toys “R” Us — I was paid $5.90/hour at the end. I also had a small 401k plan. Not the worst college job.

For the top college athletes their sport is their college job. Their scholarship may cover tuition, books, room & board, but it doesn’t help them if they have family that needs financial help. And what if they get injured during playing college sports? Yes, they’re getting a degree that’ll help later on, but to stay in college many of the top athletes pass on a lucrative professional contract that would allow them to help their family now — while hoping they don’t get a career-ending injury.

Most college athletes aren’t anticipating a big contract after graduation, nor should they expect big endorsement deals during college. Though I could see local businesses offering sponsorship to popular team athletes. I can also see problems with male players getting more & bigger deals than female players who’re just as popular/talented.

Chaifetz Arena is home to the Saint Louis University (SLU) basketball team.

Here’s the results of the recent non-scientific Sunday Poll:

Q: Should College Athletes Be Able To Get Paid For Their Name, Image, or Likeness?

  • Yes: 10 [47.62%]
  • Unsure: 6 [28.57%]
  • No: 3 [14.29%]
  • Don’t care: 2 [9.52%]

It’ll be interesting to see how the NCAA writes & enforces the new rules around college athletes.

Also, congrats to the SLU women’s soccer team for getting to play in the NCAA Tournament.

— Steve Patterson

Thank You To All U.S. Veterans

November 11, 2019 Events/Meetings, Featured Comments Off on Thank You To All U.S. Veterans
 

Today is a day to honor veterans of the U.S. armed forces. I never served, but my oldest brother spent 24 years in the Navy (1969-1993).

Veterans Day (originally known as Armistice Day) is a federal holiday in the United States observed annually on November 11, for honoring military veterans, that is, persons who have served in the United States Armed Forces (and were discharged under conditions other than dishonorable) It coincides with other holidays including Armistice Day and Remembrance Day which are celebrated in other countries that mark the anniversary of the end of World War I. Major hostilities of World War I were formally ended at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, when the Armistice with Germany went into effect. At the urging of major U.S. veteran organizations, Armistice Day was renamed Veterans Day in 1954.

Veterans Day is distinct from Memorial Day, a U.S. public holiday in May. Veterans Day celebrates the service of all U.S. military veterans, while Memorial Day honors those who have died while in military service. There is another military holiday, Armed Forces Day, a minor U.S. remembrance that also occurs in May, which honors those currently serving in the U.S. military. (Wikipedia)

St. Louis’ WWI memorial, known as Soldiers Memorial. Click image to view website.

I found the following on the VA’s FAQ for today:

Q. Which is the correct spelling of Veterans Day?

a. Veterans Day
b. Veteran’s Day
c. Veterans’ Day

A. Veterans Day (choice a, above). Veterans Day does not include an apostrophe but does include an “s” at the end of “veterans” because it is not a day that “belongs” to veterans, it is a day for honoring all veterans.

A planned Veterans Day Ceremony and Wreath Laying today at Soldiers Memorial has been canceled. Many regional Veterans Day events were held on Saturday.

— Steve Patterson

Sunday Poll: Should College Athletes Be Able To Get Paid For Their Name, Image, or Likeness?

November 10, 2019 Featured Comments Off on Sunday Poll: Should College Athletes Be Able To Get Paid For Their Name, Image, or Likeness?
 
Please vote below

No, this blog isn’t becoming a sports blog — but for 15+ years I’ve posted about politics & public policy.  College athletes being compensated, especially those attending state schools, is a part of the public policy dialogue.

Recently the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) voted for a major change of policy:

The NCAA’s move comes on the heels of the California’s Fair Pay To Play Act, signed by Gov. Gavin Newsom back in late September. The legislation sets a path for collegiate athletes in the state to benefit off their likeness, whether it be from sponsorships, appearances, video games, etc. And while that was set to go into effect in 2023, the NCAA’s proposed allowance would begin in 2021. (Yahoo Sports)

California wasn’t alone in pushing for this policy change.

Pressure from states, with California taking the lead and Florida, New York and New Jersey quickly piling on, broke down a longstanding NCAA rule prohibiting student athletes from earning money from endorsements and other outside sponsorships. (Politico)

There is a lot of debate about this issue — no consensus if this change is good or bad policy. What do you think?

This poll will close at 8pm tonight. My thoughts and the results Wednesday morning.

— Steve Patterson

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