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Food Trucks Now Welcomed By Downtown Organization

For years the Partnership for Downtown St. Louis opposed food carts/trucks, saying they were unfair competition to brick & mortar restaurants.

Food truckle on Locust for a Partnership for Downtown lunchtime event
Food truckle on Locust for a Partnership for Downtown lunchtime event on Tuesday

I’m glad to see they’re finally on board with mobile food. Here’s the info from Tuesday:

Lunchtime Live!
What: Lunchtime Live! Concert Series

Where: Old Post Office Plaza (8th & Locust)

When: Every Tuesday, May – September (11:30 am – 1:30 pm)

More Information: 314-436-6500 ext. 237 or [email protected]

The Partnership for Downtown St. Louis is scheduled to present Lunchtime Live!, a concert series at the Old Post Office Plaza, occurring every Tuesday, May – September. The Old Post Office Plaza is a unique 30,000 square-foot open space that is surrounded by restaurants, hotels, office and residential buildings, right in the heart of Downtown.

Each week, a different band will perform and an assortment of Food Trucks will be featured. This week (6/10) we invite you to listen to the musical stylings of the Trixie Delighter and enjoy delicious food from Bombay Food Junkies, Guerilla, My Big Fat Greek Truck and Sweet Divine! (source)

Given that no food establishments face their Old Post Office Plaza the options for food are limited. Brick & mortar restaurants aren’t going to prepare food, set up tents, during the lunch rush hour to sell to a smallish crowd.  I think more activities and more food trucks will attract more people, benefitting everyone. I’m glad to see they’ve changed their policy.

— Steve Patterson

 

Chesterfield Valley May Add Shelters At Inaccessible MetroBus Stops

June 9, 2014 Accessibility, Featured, Planning & Design, Public Transit, Retail, St. Louis County, THF Realty Watch, Walkability Comments Off on Chesterfield Valley May Add Shelters At Inaccessible MetroBus Stops

I applaud Chesterfield’s continued support of pubic transportation. Last week I read about more potentially good news:

Chesterfield’s City Council on Monday night gave initial approval an cooperation agreement between the city, Metro, and the Chesterfield Valley Transportation Development District for of bus stop shelters in Chesterfield valley and in other areas of the city in which there are Metro bus routes. A final vote on the legislation is set for June 16. (stltoday)

Bus shelters are an improvement, but what about getting to/from the shelters?

One of five MetroBus stops along Chesterfield Airport Rd serving retail in the Chesterfield Valley, just a sign on the shoulder
One of five MetroBus stops along Chesterfield Airport Rd serving retail in the Chesterfield Valley, just a sign on the shoulder (below highway 40 sign). Click image for map.
The other side of the same stop shows the grass that must be crossed to/from the stop. A sidewalk exists at this spot but not all stops have a sidewalk nearby.
The other side of the same stop shows the grass that must be crossed to/from the stop. A sidewalk exists at this spot but not all stops have a sidewalk nearby.

I took these images in October when I checked out the area in a rental car. My conclusion was Chesterfield Valley is an ADA nightmare, taking MetroBus to shop wouldn’t be possible in a wheelchair. Given that everything was built since the big flood of 1993, it should be ADA-compliant.  I checked Chesterfield’s ADA Transition Plan, there’s no mention of their responsibility in the public right-of-way.

I’d love to meet former Chesterfield Mayor & Metro President John Nations and current mayor Bob Nation at one of these MetroBus stops to have them see the challenges the transit-using public, including the able-bodied, face in navigating this area on foot.

— Steve Patterson

 

Neighborhood Retail In Older Suburbs

Driving around the inner ring suburb of Overland recently I was struck at the number of corner retail buildings adjacent to the residential streets. Unlike more recent suburbs, where retail is miles away from housing, these were very close. End of street close. Today when we think of retailing in the suburbs it’s easy to assume it was always big boxes or enclosed mall, but like the inner city, it started off with stores within walking distance.

Lackland at Ashby, click for map
This storefront building facing Lackland, just east of Ashby, was built in 1950. Click for map
This building was built in 1952, to the east of the previous.
This building was built in 1952, to the east of the previous.
The 1952 building even included a 2-story section
The 1952 building even included a 2-story section
Most of the housing in this area are modest one-story  homes from the 1920s-1960s, this house across the street was built in 1844
Most of the housing in this area are modest one-story homes from the 1920s-1960s, this house directly across Lackland was built in 1844
The commercial building a block east, at 10236 Lockland, was built in 1936. I don't know the prior uses, my guess was a market.
The commercial building a block east, at 10236 Lockland, was built in 1936. I don’t know the prior uses, my guess was a market.
The 21,000+ square foot commercial building at Lackland Rd & Bryant Ave was built in 1947
The 21,000+ square foot commercial building at Lackland Rd & Bryant Ave was built in 1947

This is far different than the 1960s subdivision in Oklahoma City where I grew up. The 1960s subdivisions I’ve seen here are very similar, by that time commercial development was further away  and with lots more parking than these examples. Suburbs & their subdivision development seemed to continue on this trajectory, except for New Urbanist developments like New Town St. Charles.

— Steve Patterson

 

 

From Art Deco To Aluminum

Work is progressing on the construction of new storefronts at the former Board of Education building located at 901 Locust St. Last November I posted about the historic Art Deco storefronts being removed, they weren’t original to the building.

Modern aluminum frames for new storefronts
Modern aluminum frames for new storefronts, these are facing 9th Street

I personally love the contrast between old architecture and crisp modern storefronts so I’m excited to see how this will turn out. I’m especially curious to know how they plan to deal with ADA access on 9th Street. It appears vaults are under part of the public sidewalk, making the task of building a ramp more difficult.

The 9th Street storefronts were tiny and not wheelchair accessible
The old 9th Street storefronts were tiny and not wheelchair accessible

It would’ve been impossible to make the old storefronts ADA compliant, sadly, they had to go. Originally the building had wood storefronts, not the best choice for retailing in the 21st Century, hopefully the aluminum will turn out nice, attracting a good tenant(s).

No post tomorrow, new weekly poll at 8am Sunday.

— Steve Patterson

 

Balancing Sidewalk Seating & Walkability at Culinaria

I love outdoor seating, see Lunch Al Fresco from last month, but I also think public sidewalks should remain passable. Achieving both requires effort to create an ideal balance. When the downtown grocery store Culinaria first opened in August 2009 there was a good balance, but over time the walkability was sacrificed in favor of twice as many tables & chairs. Take a look:

When Culinaria opened in August 2009 bikes were the biggest obstacle on the sidewalk
When Culinaria opened in August 2009 bikes were the biggest obstacle on the sidewalk
There was even enough room for a nice planter.
There was even a nice planter.
july 2013
Over the years the number of tables & chairs doubled! The remaining sidewalk was so narrow people had to walk single file the entire city block. Photo from June 2013
In November 2013 the tables & chairs were pushed aside for winter, not done in prior winters. The sidewalk was again clear.
In November 2013 the tables & chairs were pushed aside for winter, not done in prior winters. The sidewalk was again clear. except for the occasional bike perpendicular to the curb.
On the afternoon of March 18, 2014 I spotted the chairs pulled back out like they'd been in prior years. Thirty minutes later I emailed this plc to the new store manager, starting a dialog.
On the afternoon of March 18, 2014 I spotted the chairs pulled back out like they’d been in prior years. Thirty minutes later I emailed this plc to the new store manager, starting a dialog.
On April 4th they still had too many tables
On April 4th the many tables were still being pulled out too far
April 10th
April 10th, our dialog continued
By April 16th nearly half the tables & chairs were removed and placed on pallets along the Locust Street side
By April 16th nearly half the tables & chairs were removed and placed on pallets along the Locust Street side
April 24th there were fewer tables & chairs but they were still using the same amount of sidewalk
April 24th there were fewer tables & chairs but they were still using the same amount of sidewalk
This May 2nd photo shows the tables & chairs still taking up as much space as a bike
This May 2nd photo shows the tables & chairs still taking up nearly as much space as a bike
May 6th no improvement in the sidewalk, but the manager says they've received compliments for reducing the number of tables & chairs
May 6th no improvement in the sidewalk, but the manager says they’ve received compliments for reducing the number of tables & chairs

I was glad to see fewer tables, but I knew they could be arranged better. Also, the remaining tables were the larger round tables that seat four, the smaller rectangle tables for two were gone. I think I’ve convinced them to remove a couple more round tables and bring back four of the rectangular tables. This will give another option for customers while maintaining the same seat count.  The seating area, and sidewalk, are now more generous and comfortable for everyone.

Yesterday the round tables were positioned as we discussed. The 4 rectangular tables weren't yet  added back as of yesterday.
Yesterday the round tables were positioned as we discussed. The 4 rectangular tables weren’t yet added back as of yesterday.

Working on better bike parking now.

— Steve Patterson

 

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