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Fall Brings Out Halloween Decor

October 16, 2015 Events/Meetings, Featured 6 Comments

I love Fall, the humidity & temperature both drop, leaves begin to change colors. And Halloween decorations go up! We don’t get many trick or treaters in our building, but our neighbor’s young son enjoys our decorations.

In the hallway we have spiders, web, blinking lights, zombie signs, and a black cat that makes scary sounds when disturbed (as opposed to our actual cat inside that makes sounds when she's disturbed.
In the hallway we have spiders, web, blinking lights, zombie signs, and a black cat that makes scary sounds when disturbed (as opposed to our actual cat inside that makes sounds when she’s disturbed.
Inside we don't do much, just a few things on our balcony door.
Inside we don’t do much, just a few things on our balcony door.

Do you decorate for Halloween? Or do you do like I used to — turn off the porch light and pretend you aren’t home?

— Steve Patterson

 

Panel To Discuss ‘Where We Stand 7th Edition: The Strategic Assessment of the St. Louis Region’ Report

Locust Street entry to the Central Library, with the Shell Building in the background
Locust Street entry to the Central Library, with the Shell Building in the background

Today’s post is about a potentially interesting panel discussion, from the email I received:

St. Louis Public Library – Central Library Auditorium
Wednesday, October 14, 2015 6:30–8 p.m. 

In today’s media, rankings are everywhere—from best ballpark food to top 10 vacation spots to most loved Harry Potter character—they can be fun and eye-catching. Rankings also inform citizens, politicians, businesses, and the media. Rankings are used to direct investments, drive competition, affect perceptions, and build a local, regional, and national narrative.

How does the St. Louis region measure up according to the numbers? Does perception match reality? How should we use rankings to tell our story? Join us for the first of three conversations to explore these questions and share your perspective.

On October 14th, St. Louis journalists Andre Hepkins (KMOV), Maria Altman (St. Louis Public Radio), Deb Peterson (St. Louis Post-Dispatch), and Alex Ihnen (NextSTL) will consider how we talk about St. Louis and rankings from East-West Gateway Council of Government’s Where We Stand 7th Edition: The Strategic Assessment of the St. Louis Region.

Check out the report before the event online at www.ewgateway.org/wws.

Brought to you by East-West Gateway Council of Governments, FOCUS-St. Louis, UMSL School for Public Policy and Administration, and the St. Louis Public Library.

I’ll be out of town so I won’t be able to attend.

— Steve Patterson

 

100 Days Until 50th Anniversary of Final Piece of Arch Placed

On October 28, 1965 the last piece of the Arch was lowered into place, so October 28, 2015 is the 50th anniversary of that event.

I’ve been posting the following image when discussing the CityArchRiver project for nearly 3 years now, the view is looking East from the Old Courthouse.

2012 rendering of Luther Ely Square extended over the highway, leading to the future Arch/museum entrance
2012 rendering of Luther Ely Square extended over the highway, leading to the future Arch/museum entrance

Two weeks ago, looking out from the 7th floor balcony of the CityArchRiver offices, I saw the work underway.

Construction on Luther Ely Square with the Old Courthouse in the background, the red line indicates the central sidewalk area
Construction on Luther Ely Square with the Old Courthouse in the background, the red line indicates the central sidewalk area

At first I thought we were going to have lots of people crossing 4th Street between Market & Chestnut — going to & from the Old Courthouse and Luther Ely Square & Arch. But as I put the rendering into this post I looked closely at the bottom and it looks like a wall is shown keeping pedestrians from crossing 4th Street mid-block. Or it’s a cut-out to pull over and drop people off — not sure.

Looking North along 4th, with Luther Ely Square on the right, temporary  Jersey Barrier wall on left.
Looking North along 4th, with Luther Ely Square on the right, temporary Jersey Barrier wall on left.

If there isn’t a wall people will cross mid-block. If there is a wall, pedestrians will be taken via a circuitous route.

Plans for the 50th anniversary will be announced shortly, but Luther Ely Square is supposed to be completed by then. The riverfront work maybe — the high river level has delayed the project.  If they can clean the mud off the work area quickly then it to should be complete, in a few weeks we’ll know.   Plans will include a festival the weekend before October 28th, and a ceremony that day.

Remember the original landscaping wasn’t finished until the early 80s, here’s a look from May 1982:

It has been almost five years since the CityArchRiver competition was reduced to five finalists.

The clock is ticking.

— Steve Patterson

 

Saturday July 18th: World Naked Bike Ride St. Louis

Tomorrow night is one of my favorite events — the World Naked Bike Ride:

The World Naked Bike Ride in St. Louis is part of an international event to raise awareness of cyclist rights and vulnerability on the road, and promote positive body image and  protest oil dependency.

This year’s 8th annual World Naked Bike Ride in St. Louis will take place on Saturday, July 18. The pre-ride WNBR festival and rally will take place on Manchester Ave. in the Grove,  between Sarah and Kentucky. Stay tuned for more details on the time of the event!

Ride safe and at your own risk! (World Naked Bike Ride St. Louis)

2012: World Naked Bike Ride St. Louis on Lemp Ave
2012: World Naked Bike Ride St. Louis on Lemp Ave

From the World Naked Bike Ride St. Louis website:

A few important things:

  • We encourage you to be safe, wear a helmet and have lights on your bike
  • We ask that photographers and press help create a safe space by being respectful and asking CONSENT to photograph, and encouraging others to do so!
  • Although you can be as bare as you dare during the ride, the St. Louis city requests that we cover our privates at the pre/post party

This year’s ride is 12 miles through the city, see the route here. The ride starts & stops on Manchester in The Grove.

If only I could still ride a bike…

— Steve Patterson

 

 

June 12th: Loving Day

June 12, 2015 Events/Meetings, Featured, History/Preservation Comments Off on June 12th: Loving Day
Mildred & Richard Loving, 1967
Mildred & Richard Loving, 1967

At the end of this month the U.S. Supreme Court will rule on two questions of marriage equality with respect to LGBT people. Forty-eight years ago they ruled on the divisive marriage question of the day: marriage between whites & non-whites, mostly blacks:

Few cases were more aptly named than Loving v. Virginia, which pitted an interracial couple – 17-year-old Mildred Jeter, who was black, and her childhood sweetheart, 23-year-old white construction worker, Richard Loving – against Virginia’s “miscegenation” laws banning marriage between blacks and whites. After marrying in Washington, D.C. and returning to their home state in 1958, the couple was charged with unlawful cohabitation and jailed. According to the judge in the case, Leon M. Bazile, “Almighty God created the races white, black, yellow, malay and red, and he placed them on separate continents…. The fact that he separated the races shows that he did not intend for the races to mix.” Judge Bazile sentenced the Lovings to a year in prison, to be suspended if the couple agreed to leave the state for the next 25 years.

The Lovings left Virginia and went to live with relatives in Washington, D.C. When they returned to visit family five years later, they were arrested for traveling together. Inspired by the civil rights movement, Mildred Loving wrote to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy for help. The couple was referred to the ACLU, which represented them in the landmark Supreme Court case, Loving v. Virginia (1967). The Court ruled that state bans on interracial marriage were unconstitutional. (Loving v. Virginia: The Case Over Interracial Marriage)

The court ruling is celebrated annually:

Loving Day is an annual celebration held on June 12, the anniversary of the 1967 United States Supreme Court decision Loving v. Virginia which struck down all anti-miscegenation laws remaining in sixteen U.S. states citing “There can be no doubt that restricting the freedom to marry solely because of racial classifications violates the central meaning of the equal protection clause.” In the United States, anti-miscegenation laws were U.S. state laws banning interracial marriage, mainly forbidding marriage between non-whites and whites. Loving Day is not yet an official recognized holiday by the U.S. government, but there is a movement to persuade U.S. President Barack Obama to make it so. Loving Day is the biggest multiracial celebration in the United States. (Wikipedia)

Additional resources:

If not for Loving v. Virgina, conservative Justice Clarence Thomas couldn’t live in or visit 17 states with his 2nd wife, but I expect him to vote again marriage equality later this month…he got his!

— Steve Patterson

 

 

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