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Must See: ‘A Walk In 1875 St. Louis’ Exhibit at the Missouri History Museum

September 18, 2015 Featured, History/Preservation 1 Comment

I’ve been wanting to see Missouri History Museum’s ‘A Walk In 1875 St. Louis’ exhibit since it opened in May. On Tuesday, my husband and I finally got there to see it.

One of the most amazing maps of a city ever created was Compton & Dry’s “Pictorial St. Louis,” drawn in 1875 and published in 1876. Using this incredibly detailed cartographic masterpiece as its backdrop, the Missouri History Museum developed A Walk in 1875 St. Louis, a 6,000 square-foot exhibition that explores the collective life of 1875 St. Louis through photographs, artifacts, news, writings and first hand accounts of the day.

The Museum’s exhibit staff wanted to create an exhibition that looks so closely at one single year in St. Louis’ history that people could imagine they were actually there. Compton & Dry’s ‘Pictorial St. Louis’ provides the perfect visual stage to create this immersive experience for visitors. 

My expectations were high, and the exhibit greatly exceeded them. I hope too see the free exhibit a few more times before it closes in February 2016.

I took a lot of photos, here’s four:

Several large spaces feature two different areas on opposite wall, this example is Fairgrounds & Soulard. In front of you is information to highlight areas on the huge panels
Several large spaces feature two different areas on opposite wall, this example is Fairgrounds & Soulard. In front of you is information to highlight areas on the huge panels
Since our loft is in the former mansion row of Lucas Place we liked seeing this panel. Lucas St is now Locust St.
Since our loft is in the former mansion row of Lucas Place we liked seeing this panel. Lucas St is now Locust St.
Besides the maps, the exhibit explains what life was like in 1875 Sr. Louis
Besides the maps, the exhibit explains what life was like in 1875 Sr. Louis
The great divorce, finalized the following year is also covered,. As tiny can see the new city limits were placed far out from the developed city.
The great divorce, finalized the following year, is addressed. As you can see, the new city limits were placed far out from the developed city.

One wall had every page from Compton & Dry’s ‘A Pictorial St. Louis’ book assembled, reprints are sold in the gift shop.  Please take time to see exhibit before it closes on February 14, 2016.

— Steve Patterson

 

Currently there is "1 comment" on this Article:

  1. guest says:

    They should use the maps to help inform a CGI high-tech movie production based in Old St. Louis about the stories of Frankie and Johnny and Stagger Lee.

     

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