Home » Featured »Sunday Poll »Transportation » Currently Reading:

Poll: In The Future, What Will You Call The I-64/I-55 Span Across The Mississippi River?

October 13, 2013 Featured, Sunday Poll, Transportation 2 Comments

Last week one of our busiest bridges was renamed/rededicated:

The span, colloquially (but inaccurately) known as the Poplar Street Bridge, was originally named for Dickmann, a former St. Louis mayor. It was renamed Monday for Clay, the former Democratic congressman from St. Louis.

In a rededication ceremony downtown, with Gov. Jay Nixon, Mayor Francis Slay and other dignitaries looking on, Clay and his son, current U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-St. Louis, pulled away a black veil to reveal the white-on-green sign announcing: “Congressman William L. Clay Sr. Bridge.” (stltoday)

This will make the traffic reports on TV & radio significantly longer, if the new name is used.

This highway bridge over the Mississippi River was completed in 1967
This highway bridge over the Mississippi River was completed in 1967

When I moved to St. Louis 23+ years ago it took me a while to figure out what the “PSB” was. Ah, Poplar Street Bridge…but it was actually the Bernard F. Dickmann Bridge. Confusing.

The poll question for this week asks what name you’ll call the span in the future. Here are the choices in the poll:

  • Bernard F. Dickmann Bridge
  • Poplar Street Bridge
  • PSB
  • Congressman William L. Clay Sr. Bridge
  • Other

These will be presented in a random order in the poll (right sidebar).

— Steve Patterson

  • JZ71

    It’ll mostly depend on what the traffic reporters call it every day. We’ve slowly moved away from “Highway Farty” to “Forty Sixty-Four”, I expect that the Poplar Street Bridge will remain “the Poplar” and the new bridge will be “the new bridge” for at least ten years. Stroking politicians’ egos is really only important to politicians. Unfortunately, they’re the ones who have the power to name (and rename) stuff like this.

  • loki03xlh

    I’ll call the William L. Clay Sr. Bridge “the Dickmann” just because I like to say “Dickmann”. I still call the Martin Luther King Memorial Bridge by its original name: Veterans’ Bridge.

Comment on this Article:







SUNDAY POLL (8AM-8PM SUNDAYS)


Check back Sunday at 8am for a new poll.

Advertisement


FACEBOOK POSTS

Thanks to whomever cleared the snow from the sidewalk on the south side of Washington Ave btwn Cardinal & Compton! ... See MoreSee Less

17 hours ago  ·  

Opening day, located at 3010 Washington Ave @ Garrison. ... See MoreSee Less

19 hours ago  ·  

Hall at top of stairs, renovated 3010 Apartment, 58 units for the #homeless ... See MoreSee Less

19 hours ago  ·  

Outdated relic or a beloved facility that should've been kept? ... See MoreSee Less

February 27, 1999 - 16 years-ago today, the Arena on Oakland Avenue was imploded. Thousands of people gathered hours before 5:45 p.m., to watch the former home of the St. Louis Blues reduced to rubble. The stock market crash of 1929 ruined the dreams of Col. Ben Brinkman, founding father of The Arena. Brinkman built The Arena at 5700 Oakland Avenue, for $1.5 million as a livestock exhibition hall next door to his other big-name property, the Highlands amusement park. The Arena opened in October 1929, just before the stock-market crash that helped bring on the Great Depression. There were few bookings at the facility, & within two years, The Arena had to sell off chairs to satisfy a debt of $1,681. It's first event was The St. Louis National Horse Show. Starting after the Civil War, it was held in Fairground's Park until moving to this new venue, where it would remain an annual event until 1953. Most of us only knew him as an elderly man, but in his youth, Gussie Busch was a frequent competitor, jumping his champion Olympic mare, Miss Budweiser, over the traces. The Tommy Dorsey Orchestra played each evening before the competition events, featuring a skinny, unknown singer named Frank Sinatra. The national cattle livestock show was next for the brand-new Arena in 1929, & this too, would be an annual event. Over the course of 70 years, the Arena would host a wide range of events, & many recall seeing the circus, Lone Ranger & Tonto, Cisco Kid, or the Three Stooges there. It would be impossible for me to list all that appeared there, but for most of my generation, it was where you saw Blues hockey, Steamers soccer, & rock concerts. It's believed over 500 concerts were held there, with over half of them sponsored by local radio station, KSHE. In an effort to keep the Blues from moving to Saskatoon, Mayor Vince Schoemehl had the City buy the Arena in 1986 & after the team moved to their new home downtown in 1994, the City found themselves paying a $50,000 a month mortgage on an empty building. Mayor Clarence Harmon and the Board of Aldermen decided to demolish it, & paid Spirtas Wrecking Co. $694,000 to do the deed. It took less than 15 seconds for the 133 lbs. of dynamite to turn the once-great exhibition hall into a pile of scrap. But like the recently demolished Admiral, they can tear it down, but they can't destroy our memories.

23 hours ago  ·  

Advertisement



Recent Comments

Advertisement

Advertisements



National Partner


theAtlanticCitieslogo1

Archives

Categories

Transportation for America Coalition